Articles



Cancers Causing the Largest Loss of Healthy Life Years Associated with Major Preventable Risk Factors

Lung cancer was by far the largest contributor of the loss of healthy years.

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As Ebola Interest Ebbs, Experts Push for Optimal Vaccines, Readiness

A team of vaccine, public health, and industry experts urge global leaders to not let up on developing as many Ebola vaccines as needed.

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Rural Americans at Higher Risk of Death from Five Leading Causes

Demographic, environmental, economic, social factors might be key to difference.

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Pregnancy and Beyond

Make healthy choices for yourself and your baby.

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American Heart Association Launches Center of Excellence Accreditation for Hospitals Offering Advanced Treatment for Heart Disease

Hospitals receive AHA/ACC evidence-based guidance in treating the most complex heart patients.  

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New Data Show Continuing Opioid Epidemic in the United States

Illicit opioids contribute to drastic increases in opioid overdose deaths across states.

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Palliative Care Improves Quality of Life in Cancer Patients

Patients who received palliative care during a bone marrow transplant reported a better quality of life and reduced symptoms during hospitalization.

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Researchers Add to Evidence That Common Bacterial Cause of Gum Disease May Drive Rheumatoid Arthritis

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory “autoimmune” response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

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For Children with Autism, the Holidays Take Planning and Communication

Keys to success during the season are advance communication and planning, including making use of modern media.

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Surgeon General Issues Landmark Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health

“How we respond to this crisis is a test for America”

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Should Dislocationm

It doesn’t have to be a lifelong problem.

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Research Reveals Insight Into How Lung Cancer Spreads

Targeting the Golgi apparatus may be useful in preventing metastasis.

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Go Green for the Holidays

When you save energy and resources, you protect the environment and safeguard health both now and for the future.

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New Methods to Combat Cell Damage That Accumulates with Age

Mitochondrial DNA discoveries by UCLA and Caltech scientists may help to prevent or delay onset of age-related diseases.

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NIH-led Effort Examines Use of Big Data for Infectious Disease Surveillance

Big data derived from electronic health records, social media, the internet and other digital sources have the potential to provide more timely and detailed information on infectious disease threats or outbreaks than traditional surveillance methods. 

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Air Pollution Linked to Blood Vessel Damage in Healthy Young Adults

Fine particulate matter air pollution may be associated with blood vessel damage and inflammation among young, healthy adults.

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Healthy Digital Media Use Habits for Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers

Media in all forms, including TV, computers, and smartphones can affect how children feel, learn, think, and behave.

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The Dermatologist - "Eczema is Firmly Established as an Immunologically-Based Disease"

Emma Guttman-Yassky, MD, PhD, a professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, has dedicated her career to unmasking the mechanisms behind atopic dermatitis (AD).

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Workplace Stress, Sleep Among Top Employee Concerns

More than a quarter of workers are stressed out, according to a national workplace health survey released Tuesday by the American Heart Association’s CEO Roundtable.

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Targeting Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors May be Important Across a Lifetime

NIH-funded study suggests efforts to prevent risk factors should extend to those older than 65.

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The Women’s Health Issue No One Talks About

About 1 out of 5 women in America will experience depression in her lifetime.

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American Cancer Society Partners with Curing Kids Cancer to Raise Funds for Pediatric Cancer

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2016, there will be 10,380 new cancer cases diagnosed among children in the United States. 

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Parents Who Administer Liquid Meds Often Make Dosing Errors, Study Says

According to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health, "Liquid Medication Errors and Dosing Tools: A Randomized Controlled Experiment."

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Federal Prize Competition Seeks Innovative Ideas to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance

Contestants will vie for $20 million in prizes to develop new innovative laboratory diagnostic tools that detect and distinguish antibiotic resistant bacteria.

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Stem Cell Breakthrough Unlocks Mysteries Associated with Inherited and Sometimes Lethal Heart Conditions

The stem cell lines scientists created in the lab have already yielded insights into unexpected disease mechanisms.

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Keeping Up in School?

In general, the earlier a learning disability is recognized and addressed, the greater the likelihood for success in school and later in life.

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NIH Review Finds Nondrug Approaches Effective for Treatment of Common Pain Conditions

U.S. study reviews trial results on complementary health approaches for pain relief; aims to assist with pain management.

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NIH Researchers Discover Otulipenia, a New Inflammatory Disease

Rare and sometimes lethal disease affects young children.

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New American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Book Offers Newly Diagnosed Hope

Written by medical experts from the American Cancer Society, with guidance from breast cancer survivors, this evidence-based book is a great resource for any breast cancer patient.

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Cupping

Why athletes do it and what the science tells us. 

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Study Shows Stomach and Side Sleeping Positions Cause Facial Distortion and Wrinkles Over Time

Number of times we change our position per night decreases from 27 to 16 as we age, increasing sleep-associated wrinkles.

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Simply Moving 30 Minutes a Day Can Lower Your Health Risks

Being sedentary increases risks for diabetes, high blood pressure and poor circulation.

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Spotlight on Psoriasis

Preventing patches of itchy, sore skin.

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Zika Infections in Miami Prompt CDC Travel Advisory

For the first time ever, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has issued a travel advisory to a part of the continental U.S.

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Is Working Long Hours Dangerous to Your Health?

The study was seeking to determine if the risk of developing problems like heart disease, lung disease, cancer, and diabetes is increased in people who work long hours. 

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Virtual Violence Impacts Children on Multiple Levels

Impact of media violence on children, including aggressive behavior and victimization.

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First Release of the Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating on Hospital Compare

The new Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating methodology takes 64 existing quality measures already reported on the Hospital Compare website and summarizes them into a unified rating of one to five stars.

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Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cases Skyrocket Increase May Be Due To More Lax Screening Or More Aggressive Disease

Highest increase among men ages 55 to 69, who could benefit the most from screening and early treatment.

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ASDS Survey: Twice As Many Considering Cosmetic Procedures

Nearly 60 percent of consumers now say they are considering a cosmetic treatment, up from 30 percent in 2013.

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Buprenorphine Implants May Be Effective Relapse Prevention Tool for Adults With Opioid Dependence

A higher percentage of stable, opioid-dependent patients given six-month buprenorphine implants remained abstinent.

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Menopause, Sleepless Nights May Make Women Age Faster

Two UCLA studies show menopause, insomnia could increase women’s risk for aging-related diseases.

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Hormone Therapy for Brain Performance: No Effect, Whether Started Early or Late

Hormone therapy for postmenopausal women has been controversial, with some studies suggesting benefits and others not. Now, a study finds the treatment’s effect on women’s mental skills is negligible.

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Early Preschool Bedtimes Cut Risk of Obesity Later On

Kids in bed by 8 p.m. have half the risk.

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A Blurry Worldview

Understanding Myopia

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Can Game Tame Kids’ Temper Tantrums?

A computer game is showing promise as a potential treatment for irritability in children.

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UCLA Study Sheds Light on How Advanced Melanoma Resists Treatment

Findings are a promising step toward developing improved treatments.

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Amino Unveils Free Personalized Cost Estimates for Nearly 50 Medical Procedures to Help Americans Navigate Health Care Costs

People can now compare costs for doctors in their area, calculate how much they might pay with their insurance, and book an appointment.

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High Levels of Urinary Paracetamol May Impair Male Fertility, NIH Study Suggests

Couples in which the male partner had high levels of paracetamol in his urine took longer to achieve pregnancy than couples in which the male had lower levels of the compound.

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Top 5 Reasons People Don’t Get Screened for Colorectal Cancer

American Cancer Society, Anthem Foundation tackle testing obstacles.

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UTMB Quality, Safety Data Available to the Public

As part of its commitment to provide useful information, UTMB makes available a broad range of measures and ratings at www.utmb.edu/qualityresults.

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CDC Awards $26 Million to Academic Medical Centers, Drives Innovation to Protect Patients

Prevention Epicenters Program supports research on new ways to prevent superbugs and improve healthcare quality.

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Some Women With PCOS May Have Adrenal Disorder, NIH Researchers Suggest

A subgroup of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a leading cause of infertility, may produce excess adrenal hormones, according to an early study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.

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World Health Organization Says Very Hot Drinks May Cause Cancer

But drops coffee from list of possible carcinogens.

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Rates of Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use and Opioid Use Disorder Double in 10 Years

Almost 10 million U.S. adults report misusing prescription opioids in 2012-2013. 

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New Diabetes Prevention Program Data Indicates Physical Activity Helps Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, Independent of Weight Loss

Physical activity, independent of weight loss, may help to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in people who are at high risk for diabetes. 

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Nearly 10 Million Adults Found to Be Severely Nearsighted in the United States

Largest U.S. study of its kind using American Academy of Ophthalmology’s national ophthalmic database also finds women at higher risk of potentially blinding complication. 

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Coping with Traumatic Events

This website has information and resources on trauma, coping and resilience.

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Medication to Treat Opioid Abuse Vastly Underused

About 1 out of 5 patients continue to access opioids after discharge from opioid use disorder inpatient treatment.

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Newly Launched Genomic Data Commons to Facilitate Data and Clinical Information Sharing

Part of the National Cancer Moonshot, GDC to centralize, standardize accessible data.

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Higher Consumption of Potatoes May Increase Risk of Hypertension

Higher intake of potatoes and French fries may be associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure (hypertension) in adults.

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Thousands of Public Pools, Hot Tubs Closed Due to Serious Violations

Check inspection results and do your own inspections before swimming this summer.

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Jennifer Krejci, MD

How has the hair transplant procedure changed with the use of robotics?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Marc R. Dean, MD

I suffer from chronic sinusitis, and medications haven't made much of a difference. I have been told I need sinus surgery, but I have heard horror stories and am hesitant to undergo the procedure-are there any other options?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Richard William Farnam, MD

Is pelvic mesh a safe treatment option for prolapse and incontinence?

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Hepatitis C Kills More Americans than Any Other Infectious Disease

New CDC studies underscore urgency of hepatitis C testing and treatment, especially for baby boomers

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FDA Approves First Drug to Treat Hallucinations and Delusions Associated with Parkinson’s Disease

Hallucinations or delusions can occur in as many as 50 percent of patients with Parkinson’s disease at some time during the course of their illness.

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Moms’ Mental Health Matters

It's not just postpartum, and it's not just depression.

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Greenness Around Homes Linked to Lower Mortality

Women live longer in areas with more green vegetation, according to new research funded by the NIEHS

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Block the Buzzing, Bites, and Bumps

Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

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Would Changing Gait Pattern Decrease Your Likelihood of Running Injuries?

Are runners less injury-prone trekking barefoot than in pricey running shoes?

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When HDL Cholesterol Doesn’t Protect Against Heart Disease

Scientists discovered a genetic mutation that raises HDL cholesterol levels but, rather than protecting against heart disease, increases the risk for it.

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CDC Releases Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain

Recommendations to improve patient care, safety, and help prevent opioid misuse and overdose.

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'Hey Siri, I’m Depressed': Can Smartphones Answer the Call for Help?

Adults are using smartphones for health information.

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Charles Butrick, MD

Question: I have urine leakage and a fallen bladder. Is surgery necessary? Does it work?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Jennifer Krejci, MD

Question: How has the hair transplant procedure changed with the use of robotics?

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Understanding Anxiety Disorders

When Panic, Fear, and Worries Overwhelm

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Air Pollution Linked to Higher Risk of Preterm Birth for Mothers with Asthma

Early exposure may affect pregnancy outcomes, NIH study finds.

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Internal Medicine Residents Who Never Certify Are More Likely To Have Disciplinary Actions

Board certification does not adversely impact physician supply and is associated with better performance during and after internal medicine residency.

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FDA Issues Recommendations to Reduce the Risk of Zika Virus Transmission

The new guidance is a part of the FDA’s ongoing efforts to protect HCT/Ps and blood products from Zika virus transmission.

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Colorectal Cancer Patients Need Colonoscopy After Cancer Resection

U.S. Multi-Society Task Force Releases New Recommendations

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American Heart Association & National Association of the Deaf Expand Accessible Heart Health Resources

The American Heart Association (AHA) and the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) announced today that they will work together to increase heart health video resources available for people who are deaf or hard of hearing.

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American Academy of Dermatology Issues New Guidelines of Care for Acne Treatment

There are a variety of effective treatments available for acne, and dermatologists have found that combining two or more treatments is the best option for the majority of patients.

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Bariatric Surgery May Reduce Life-Threatening Heart Failure Exacerbation in Obese Patients

Findings support ability of significant weight loss to prevent adverse events related to heart failure.

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Focusing on Fibromyalgia

 A Puzzling and Painful Condition.

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Diabetes Drug May Prevent Recurring Strokes

Pioglitazone, a drug used for type 2 diabetes, may prevent recurrent stroke and heart attacks in people with insulin resistance but without diabetes.

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The New Health 'Desert'? Reliable Weight Loss Programs Hard to Find

A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers concludes that people with medically serious weight problems can rarely find or have access to proven, reliable programs to help them shed pounds.  

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AAP Statement on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Final Recommendation Statement on Autism Screening

The AAP stands behind its recommendation that all children be screened for ASD at ages 18 and 24 months, along with regular developmental surveillance.

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Saving a “Lost Generation”: The Need to Prevent Drug and alcohol Abuse in Midlife

A recent study funded by the National Institute on Aging reveals the unexpected enormity of the problem and its disastrous consequences for a generation of Americans.

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HHS proposes changes to the rules governing the confidentiality of substance use disorder records

Proposed changes would facilitate health information exchange to support delivery system reform efforts while protecting the privacy of patients seeking treatment for a substance use disorder.

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HIV is Still Growing, Even When Undetectable in the Blood

Study challenges previous beliefs about dormant virus and charts a “path to a cure.”

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NIH Seeks Research Applications to Study Zika in Pregnancy, Developing Fetus

New effort seeks to understand virus’ effect on reproduction, child development.

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Newer Pain Management Strategies Can Lead to Quicker, Shorter Recovery After Total Knee Replacements

A team-based care approach in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes.

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Natural Protein Points To New Inflammation Treatment

Pharmaceutical compounds or other therapeutic methods that produce elevated levels of TTP in humans may offer an effective treatment for some inflammatory diseases.

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President Obama Proposes $1.1 Billion in New Funding to Address the Prescription Opioid Abuse and Heroin Use Epidemic

Budget includes new mandatory funding to help ensure that all Americans who want treatment can get the help they need.

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The Needle is the New Knife: Advances in Dermal Fillers

Developments in techniques, materials improve results for patients.

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Kaiser Permanente Study Shows Minorities Had Lower Risk of Coronary Heart Disease than Whites

Findings indicate that health plan's systematic efforts to improve risk-factor control may help reduce or eliminate racial and ethnic disparities.

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Brain Structure Governing Emotion Is Passed Down From Mother to Daughter, Says UCSF Study

Research is first evidence that brain structure implicated in depression may be inherited.

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Could Blood Pressure Drugs Have a Role in Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment?

In laboratory neuronal cultures, an FDA-approved drug used to treat high blood pressure reduced cell damage often linked to Alzheimer's disease.

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Transplant Centers Often Reject Potential Donor Livers for Sickest Patients in Need, says New Penn Medicine Research

Study's findings show this practice places patients at greater risk of death while waiting for a lifesaving transplant.

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Study Suggests Teens Who Consume More Dietary Fiber Less Likely to Develop Breast Cancer Later

A high-fiber diet may reduce the incidence of breast cancer by decreasing levels of estrogen circulating in the blood.

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Protein Combination Improves Bone Regeneration, UCLA Study Shows

Findings have potential for effective clinical therapeutics to treat bone defects and osteoporosis

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'Pop Quiz' Could Help Predict Sexually Transmitted Infections in Young Women

Researchers at Johns Hopkins say an online “pop quiz” they developed in 2009 shows promising accuracy in predicting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in young women.

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CHOP Researchers: 3T Fetal MRI Imaging Improves Prenatal Diagnosis of Birth Defects

Ongoing research efforts are focused on improving upon existing MRI technology to enhance the prenatal evaluation and diagnosis of patients facing a birth defect.

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CMS Releases First Ever Home Health Patient Experience of Care Star Ratings

Known as Home Health Care Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HHCAHPS) Survey star ratings, these measures evaluate patients’ experiences with home health agencies.

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Hypothermia and Older Adults

Hypothermia can develop in older adults after even relatively mild exposure to cold weather or a small drop in temperature.

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More Than 1 in 20 U.S. Children Have Dizziness and Balance Problems

The research was led by investigators at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), part of the National Institutes of Health.

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Eight In 10 Marketplace Customers In HealthCare.gov States Qualify For A Tax Credit

Many who selected or were automatically enrolled in a 2016 plan through the Marketplace qualify for a tax credit.

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Nickel Allergy: Dermatologists Share Tips to Avoid Exposure and Reduce Symptoms

According to board-certified dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, nickel is one of the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis.

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Campaign Targets the 86 Million American Adults with Prediabetes

Are you at risk? Take a short online test at doihaveprediaetes.org to learn your risk.

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How Do Doctors Die?

New research finds that physicians are less likely to undergo intense end-of-life treatments compared to the general population.

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Trying to Conceive Soon After a Pregnancy Loss May Increase Chances of Live Birth

NIH study finds no reason for delaying pregnancy attempts after a loss without complications.

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Even Small Reductions in Kidney Function May Damage Heart, Blood Vessels

If blood tests show your kidney function is reduced, talk to your doctor about your risk of heart disease and how best to lower it.

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Be 1 in a Million: Mental Health First Aid Should be “As Common as CPR”

National Council for Behavioral Health Announces a Campaign to Train 1 Million Americans in Mental Health First Aid.

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How to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival in Three Easy Steps

Dr. Bobrow and his team propose three concrete steps communities and the nation can take to improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

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Taking Vitamin D May Benefit People with Multiple Sclerosis

Taking a high dose of vitamin D3 is safe for people with multiple sclerosis and may help regulate the body's hyperactive immune response, according to a pilot study published by Johns Hopkins physicians.

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Parental Concerns about Medical Treatments for Short, Healthy Kids

Is short stature a problem? In particular, when it does not result from an underlying disease, does it justify giving a child nightly injections of human growth hormone?

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Research Team Led by Intermountain Medical Center Physician Discovers New Cure for Hepatitis C Virus in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

About 2.7 million people in the United States have a chronic hepatitis C virus infection, which can lead to liver failure or death.

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Pesticide Found in Milk Decades Ago May Be Associated with Signs of Parkinson’s

A pesticide used prior to the early 1980s and found in milk at that time may be associated with signs of Parkinson's disease in the brain.

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Genetic Study of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Could Lead to Better Treatments

Genetic variation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) appears to play a major role in determining how sick they will become and could provide a roadmap for more effective treatments.

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Mayo Clinic Leads Global Effort to Standardize Diagnosis of Kidney Disease

Kidney disease is a major health concern worldwide. It's estimated that 1 in 3 American adults are at risk of developing kidney disease, and 26 million adults already have kidney disease.

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Ask Super Doctors - Dr. Joel G. Gotvald

What are the latest modern treatments for varicose veins and spider veins of the legs?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Gil Tepper, MD

How should someone select a surgeon?

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Yoga Helps Maintain Quality of Life, May Lessen Side Effects in Men Undergoing Prostate Cancer Treatment

Men with prostate cancer who are undergoing radiation therapy can benefit from yoga.

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Reported Cases of Sexually Transmitted Diseases on the Rise, Some at Alarming Rate

"America's worsening STD epidemic is a clear call for better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention," said Jonathan Mermin, M.D., director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention.

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Who Should Be Screened for Lung Cancer?

Although it is not common, lung cancer sometimes causes symptoms in the early stages. Most of the symptoms are more likely to be caused by something that isn't lung cancer. But it's important to go to the doctor so the cause can be found and treated.

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A Look at Epilepsy

When you hear the word epilepsy, you might think of intense seizures with muscle spasms and loss of consciousness. But most epilepsy seizures are surprisingly subtle and may be hard to recognize.

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Tackling Concussions on the Front Line

A few decades ago, when a football player got his "bell rung" with a hard hit to the head, he would shake it off, take smelling salts and return to the game.Times have changed.

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Heart CT Scans Outperform Stress Tests in Spotting Clogged Arteries

Johns Hopkins researchers show that noninvasive CT scans of the heart's vessels are far better at spotting clogged arteries that can trigger a heart attack than the commonly prescribed exercise stress that most patients with chest pain undergo.

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Health Care Costs for Dementia Found Greater Than Any Other Disease

NIH-funded study examines medical, care costs in last five years of life.

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Dr. Nina Schooler Discusses New Schizophrenia Treatment Recommendations on National Public Radio

Nina Schooler PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, recently discussed new treatment recommendations for persons diagnosed with first episode schizophrenia.

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US Flu Levels Low As New Season's Reporting Starts

So far the CDC has seen no significant drift in currently circulating flu viruses, as it did last season.

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Good Outcomes With Egg Donors Over 35

A greater willingness to work with older donors could help patients who prefer to work with a relative or friend as donor.

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Don’t Fall For The Unexpected This Halloween

Orthopaedic surgeons offer safety tips to trick-or-treaters.

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FDA Approves Combination Drug for Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a tablet that combines the drugs trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (Lonsurf®) to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed after standard treatments.

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Mayo Receives Federal Grant to Develop Smart Devices to Predict, Stop Seizures

The grant, part of a presidential initiative aimed at revolutionizing the understanding of the human brain, is called Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies or the BRAIN Initiative.

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New NIH Breast Cancer Research to Focus on Prevention

This broadened research focus will add to the growing knowledge of environmental and genetic factors that may influence breast cancer risk across the lifespan.

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Stimulant Medications Safe and Effective for Children With ADHD and Congenital Heart Disease

A new study finds that children with congenital heart disease and ADHD can take stimulant medications without fear of significant cardiovascular side effects.

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Connecting Alzheimer’s Disease and the Immune System

There's an emerging theme in Alzheimer's genetics that the immune system may be strongly involved in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

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New Autism Genes Are Revealed in Largest-Ever Study

Work draws more detailed picture of genetic risk, sheds light on sex differences in diagnosis.

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HHS Sponsors Development of Drug for Hospitalized Influenza Patients

With unique ‘mechanism of action,' drug could become first in new class of influenza antivirals.

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COPD Heightens Deadly Lung Cancer Risk in Smokers

The largest-ever epidemiologic study of small cell lung cancer (SCLC)-is the first to look at how much COPD, a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe, increases smokers' risk of getting SCLC.

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Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) Launches Online Application Portal

"The UDN Gateway will provide patients and their families access to the nation's leading diagnostic teams and sophisticated diagnostic tools."-James M. Anderson, M.D., Ph.D., Director, NIH's Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives (DPCPSI)

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Link Between Air Pollution, Increased Deaths & Deaths from Heart Disease Affirmed

In what is believed to be the largest, most detailed study of its kind in the United States, scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere have confirmed that tiny chemical particles in the air we breathe are linked to an overall increase in risk of death.

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Yoga Improves Arthritis Symptoms and Mood, Study Finds

Johns Hopkins researchers report that 8 weeks of yoga classes improved the physical and mental wellbeing of people with two common forms of arthritis.

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Rates of Preventive Double Mastectomy in Men Nearly Doubles

Rates of contralateral preventive mastectomy in men nearly doubled between 2004 and 2011.

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Is Albuterol Overuse a Marker of Psychological Distress?

There are many factors which can influence rescue-inhaler overuse but a study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Lung Association (ALA) has just highlighted a commonly overlooked one: depression.

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Dermatologists Warn: Don’t Let Skin Cancer Sneak Up On You

To help people spot skin cancer early, when it's most treatable, dermatologists are urging everyone - including busy parents - to learn the ABCDEs of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer.

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Most Americans' Hearts Are Older Than Their Age

Higher heart age means higher risk of heart attacks and stroke.

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Longer Colonoscopies Linked to Lower Cancer Rate

If a colonoscopy seems like the type of thing you'd like to get done with quickly, think again.

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Physician Support Key to Successful Weight Loss, Study Shows

Findings affirm value of physician involvement in changing unhealthy behavior.

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All About ALS

In the summer of 2014, social media was taken by storm with videos of people pouring ice water on themselves for the Ice Bucket Challenge. The worldwide phenomenon raised awareness-and millions of research dollars-for a fatal disease called ALS.

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Influenza Vaccines Provide Moderate Protection throughout the Entire Flu Season

Individuals who received the flu vaccine were protected for up to 6 months post-vaccination, the duration of most flu seasons.

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Nearly All Contact Lens Wearers Report Risky Eye Care Behaviors

Almost all of the 41 million estimated contact lens wearers in the United States may be engaging in at least one behavior known to increase their risk of eye infections.

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Vitamin D: Don’t Overdo It, Especially For Obese Teens

Vitamin D in teens: Don't overdo it, bad things may happen

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Speedy Treatment of Stroke Patients with New Clot Retrieval Device Vastly Improves Outcomes

Even short delays have a measurable impact on patients' chance at a successful recovery, UCLA study finds

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FDA Approves First Treatment For Sexual Desire Disorder

"Today's approval provides women distressed by their low sexual desire with an approved treatment option," said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER).

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Hepatitis C Infection May Fuel Heart Risk

People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble.

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NIH Analysis Shows Americans Are In Pain

Report examines the prevalence, severity, and duration of pain.

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First Reports of Robotic Surgery for Advanced Vena Cava Tumor Due to Kidney Cancer

Surgeons Describe Positive Outcomes in The Journal of Urology®

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Too Few Kidney Dialysis Patients Referred for Organ Transplant, Study Finds

Only about one in four in Georgia get further evaluation.

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Depressed Teens at Risk of Heart Disease, Early Monitoring Urged

For the first time, experts urge early monitoring and assertive intervention to reduce risk factors for heart and blood vessel disease among teens with major depression or bipolar disorder.

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Most US Middle and High Schools Start the School Day Too Early

Too-early start times can keep students from getting the sleep they need for health, safety, and academic success, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Processed Meat Consumption is Not Good for Sperm’s Fertilizing Ability

A recent study suggests the type of meat a man consumes may influence his sperm's ability to fertilize an egg.

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Positive Emotions and Your Health: Developing a Brighter Outlook

NIH-funded scientists are working to better understand the links between your attitude and your body.

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CDC Says Teens Still Not Getting HPV Vaccination

Most people who have HPV-the most common sexually transmitted disease-don't know they are infected. The CDC recommends that girls and boys be vaccinated starting at age 11 or 12, so they can develop immunity before they are sexually active.

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FDA Approves New Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 3 Infections

A new option for patients with genotype 3 HCV, including those patients who cannot tolerate ribavirin.

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Hysterectomy May Indicate Cardiovascular Risk in Women Under Age 50

Hysterectomy may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk and disease, especially in women under 35, according to Mayo Clinic experts.

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Teeth Reveal Lifetime Exposures to Metals, Toxins

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell?

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“Safe to Sleep” Expert Offers Advice on Reducing Sudden Infant Death

It's any parent's worst nightmare: putting the new baby to sleep at night and discovering the next morning that the child has passed away. In the U.S., more than 3,500 infants die each year from sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, and from what experts describe as "other sleep-related causes of infant death."

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Ask Super Doctors – AKASH BAJAJ, MD, MPH

Question: Are there home remedies for back pain?

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Ask Super Doctors – AKASH BAJAJ, MD, MPH

Question: Can I get rid of my back pain without surgery?

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Hospitals Often Overestimate Their Ability To Deliver Fast Stroke Care

Study Highlights: When asked about administering the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to stroke patients, hospital staff perceptions did not always line up with actual performance.

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Yale Researchers Beat Untreatable Eczema With Arthritis Drug

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have successfully treated patients with moderate to severe eczema using a rheumatoid arthritis drug.

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Can You Avoid Middle-Age Spread?

As you age, you may notice you have less muscle and energy and more fat. Carrying those extra pounds may be harming your health.

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Today’s Heroin Epidemic: More People at Risk, Multiple Drugs Abused

More than 9 in 10 people who used heroin also used at least one other drug.

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Safer, With More Benefits: Parents’ Vaccine Views Shifting

The University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health asked parents in May how their views on vaccinations changed between 2014 and 2015 - during which two dozen measles outbreaks were reported in the U.S., including a multi-state outbreak traced to Disneyland.

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Boys More Likely to Have Antipsychotics Prescribed, Regardless of Age

NIH-funded study is the first look at antipsychotic prescriptions patterns in the U.S.

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Brain and Spine Surgery No More Risky When Physicians-In-Training Participate, Study Finds

Resident contributions to care have no effect on rates of complications or death, data analysis shows

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American Heart Association Survey Reveals Americans Have Potentially Dangerous Misconceptions About Heart Failure

Nearly six million Americans currently live with heart failure, yet a recent national survey found potentially dangerous misconceptions and knowledge gaps about the disease.

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Surgical Anesthesia in Young Children Linked to Effects on IQ, Brain Structure

Children who received general anesthesia for surgery before age 4 had diminished language comprehension, lower IQ and decreased gray matter density in posterior regions of their brain, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics.

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Opioid Epidemic: Medication-Assisted Treatment Need Significantly Exceeds Capacity

A new study published in the American Journal of Public Health shows a number of actions that can be taken to address the treatment gap.

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Researchers Devise A Better Way To Potentially Avert Blindness

More than 7.7 Americans suffer from diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in American adults.

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Ask Super Doctors - Dr. Richard William Farnam

Is it true that having a Hysterectomy can cause Cancer?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Serang Desai and Dr. Adam Crawford

What are your tips for maintaining overall joint health?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Mitchell Fagelman and Dr. Adam Crawford

When should someone schedule a consultation with an Orthopedic specialist?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Galen Wachtman

What excites you about the future of hand surgery?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Galen Wachtman

Does every hand condition require surgery?

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Galen Wachtman

Can plastic surgeons treat broken bones in the hand?

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Majority of Seriously Ill Youth Do Not Receive Treatment

New findings might help efforts to increase mental health treatment of children and adolescents who are in the greatest need.

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Animals’ Presence May Ease Social Anxiety in Kids with Autism

When animals are present, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have lower readings on a device that detects anxiety and other forms of social arousal when interacting with their peers.

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AMSSM Launches New Sports Medicine Website Geared Toward Parents and the Public

The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) is pleased to announce the launch of its new patient -focused website.

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Nail Technicians’ Health and Workplace Exposure Control

Concerns about chemicals routinely used by nail technicians drew new attention following the publication of a two-part investigative series in the New York Times.

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Study Links Father’s Age and Risk of Blood Cancer as an Adult

The proportion of parents who delay having children until age 35 or older continues to increase, but the long-term health consequences for these children are still emerging.

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Medicaid and CHIP: Families Can Apply at Any Time – So Why Wait?

We want families to know that they can apply for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) at any time - there's no deadline.

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A History of Lyme Disease, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

It was not until 1981 that NIAID researchers identified the cause of Lyme disease and discovered the connection between the deer tick and the disease.

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Cholesterol-Lowering Supplements: Lower Your Numbers without Prescription Medication

Although few natural products have been proven to reduce cholesterol, some might be helpful. With your doctor's OK, consider these cholesterol-lowering supplements and products.

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Overnight Fasting May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk in Women

New evidence suggests that when and how often people eat can also play a role in cancer risk.

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Researchers’ “Hugely Exciting” Asthma Discovery

Scientists discover asthma's potential root cause and a novel treatment.

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Medicare Patients Undergo Unnecessary Tests Before Cataract Surgery, Study Finds

More than half of all Medicare patients who have cataract surgery undergo unnecessary routine preoperative testing, despite strong evidence that these tests are usually not beneficial.

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Protect Your Shoulder From Painful Injuries

Orthopaedic surgeons offer exercises to help strengthen shoulder joints.

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Ask Super Doctors – Dr. Jordan C. Stern

What is the best treatment for sleep apnea?

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Can Facial Plastic Surgery Make You More Likeable?

Facial plastic surgery may do more than make you look youthful.

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How Does Mother’s Depression Affect the Fetal Brain?

Look at the Amygdala.

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Your Pain Reliever May Be Diminishing Your Joy

Acetaminophen reduces both pain and pleasure, study finds.

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NIH Still Active in Gulf Region Five Years After Oil Spill

Three-part research approach focuses on communities and health.

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Dysfunction in the Home is Especially Dangerous for Children at Risk for Asthma

Dysfunction in the home is especially dangerous for children at risk for asthma.

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Few Commercial Weight-Loss Programs Show Reliable Evidence of Effectiveness, Johns Hopkins Reports

To help physicians guide obese and overweight patients who want to try a commercial weight-loss program, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers reviewed 4,200 studies for solid evidence of their effectiveness but concluded only a few dozen of the studies met the scientific gold standard of reliability.

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Are Dietary Goals for Sodium and Potassium Reasonable?

Only about 0.3% Americans now meet World Health Organization (WHO) sodium and potassium targets.

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HHS Takes Strong Steps to Address Opioid-Drug Related Overdose, Death and Dependence

Evidence-based, bipartisan efforts focus on prescribing practices and treatment to reduce prescription opioid and heroin use disorders.

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White House Releases Plan to Curb Antibiotic Resistance

The plan is part of multipronged effort to address antibiotic resistance.

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FDA Approves New Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes (type 1 and type 2) affects more than 29 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of new blindness among people ages 20 to 74 years.

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HHS Launches Innovative Digital Storytelling Project to Support Federal HIV Response

Personal stories encourage HIV prevention, testing and treatment.

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Misperceptions Keep Kids from Getting Lifesaving Treatment for Tickborne Diseases

Kids are five times more likely than adults to die from tickborne diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF).

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Introducing New Website for Teens with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: JustLikeMeIBD.org

The number of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients in the U.S. has now increased to an estimated 1.6 million, with approximately 5 percent of that patient population under the age of 18.

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Study: Association Between Migraine and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are more than twice as likely to have migraine headaches, reports a study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery-Global Open®

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Why People with Diabetes Can't Buy Generic Insulin

Drug companies' incremental changes keep drugs patented, costly, Johns Hopkins study shows.

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Strengthening the Immune System’s Fight Against Brain Cancer

NIH-funded research suggests novel way to improve vaccine efficacy in brain tumors.

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Are You 65 or Older? Get Two Vaccinations Against Pneumonia

If you or a loved one is age 65 or older, getting vaccinated against pneumonia is a good idea - so good that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) now recommends that everyone in this age group get vaccinated against pneumonia twice.

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Oncologists Reveal Reasons for High Cost of Cancer Drugs, Recommend Solutions

Increasingly high prices for cancer drugs are affecting patient care in the U.S. and the American health care system overall, say the authors of a special article published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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HHS Expands Its Approach to Making Research Results Freely Available For the Public

HHS released a comprehensive set of plans outlining how its agencies will expand access to the results of scientific research for the public.

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Better Check Your Bowels: Screening for Colon and Rectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death nationwide. But it can usually be cured when caught early.

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Health Exchange, Medicare Advantage Plans Must Keep Updated Doctor Directories In 2016

Starting next year, the federal government will require health insurers to give millions of Americans enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans or in policies sold in the federally run health exchange up-to-date details about which doctors are in their plans and taking new patients.

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UTMB Study Shows Testosterone Being Prescribed When Not Medically Needed

A new study by the University of Texas Medical Branch found that 20 percent of men were prescribed testosterone despite having normal testosterone levels based on the Endocrine Society's guidelines.

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ACIP Drops Preference for Nasal-Spray Flu Vaccine in Kids

Faced with new data that conflict with older findings, the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) today voted to drop its advice that the nasal-spray influenza vaccine should be preferred over injectable vaccines for children from 2 through 8 years old.

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2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Submits Report

The advisory committee's recommendations report is online, making it available for public review and comment.

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Heart Health Goes Mobile: Free App Empowers Consumers to Take Charge of Their Personal Health Management

Heart health goes mobile and social with the release of BioGram.

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Report: Long-Term Ebola Threat Makes Vaccines Essential

A team of health experts concerned about the long-term threat of Ebola released today a lengthy set of recommendations for the development of Ebola vaccines, saying that the push to test vaccines in West Africa must continue even if fading cases make it difficult to tell for certain if the inoculations are working.

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Surgery for Pulmonary Embolism May Prevent More Deaths Than Drug Therapy Alone

A surgical procedure that was virtually abandoned in the 1950s because of its high mortality rates in trying to save patients with acute pulmonary embolism may actually prevent more deaths in severely ill patients than current drug therapies alone.

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Study Identifies Eight Signs Associated With Impending Death in Cancer Patients

MD Anderson research may aid physicians' ability to prognosticate, help patients and families make difficult personal, treatment decisions

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Help for Hay Fever Sufferers: Experts Outline Best Practices for Treating Fifth Most Common Disease

About one in five Americans suffers from allergic rhinitis, commonly called "hay fever," the fifth most common disease in the U.S., with health care costs of $2 billion to $5 billion per year.

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CDC Sounds Alarm about Early Measles Spike

A warning from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that Americans should be vaccinated and that clinicians be on guard for detecting and preventing the disease.

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Cuomo Wants to Pull Plug on Free Website That Reveals Malpractice Info about Docs

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to pull the plug on a free state website that provides details about New York doctors' medical malpractice records, hospital affiliations and other background information.

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Are Clinical Trials Right for Me? Creating an Online Decision-Making Tool for Patients

Unfortunately, although clinical trials are critical for advancing cancer treatment and ultimately serve as the basis for new standards of care, very few patients participate.

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Chronic Insomniacs May Face Increased Risk of Hypertension

Insomniacs who take longer than 14 minutes to fall asleep face a greater risk of hypertension, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

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Prompt Use of Antivirals is Key this Flu Season

Influenza activity in the United States is widespread and likely to continue for weeks. Read more about what physicians can do.

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Interrupting Cycle of Violence before Young Perpetrators and their Victims Reach Adulthood

Widespread among adolescents, intimate partner violence and sexual violence can place young people on a lifelong trajectory of aggression -- either as victims or perpetrators -- endangering their sexual and reproductive health now and in the future.

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Too Much Sitting Linked To Serious Health Risks

Accumulated evidence suggests that sitting for prolonged periods of time increases risk for heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and death, regardless of whether a person exercises regularly or not.

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To Beet Or Not To Beet? Researchers Test Theories of Beet Juice Benefits

Athletes who down beet juice before exercising to increase blood flow and improve performance may be surprised at the results of a recent study conducted at Penn State's Noll Laboratory.

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Win Some, Lose Some

When Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage started in 2006, many experts voiced concerns about disabled patients with serious mental illness making the transition from Medicaid to Medicare.

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Pro-Marijuana ‘Tweets’ Are Sky-High on Twitter

The findings are reported online Jan. 22 in the Journal of Adolescent Health and will appear in February in the journal's print edition.

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Many Americans are at Risk for Alcohol-Medication Interactions

Nearly 42 percent of U.S. adults who drink also report using medications known to interact with alcohol.

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Panel Concerned About Long-Term Effectiveness of Treating Chronic Pain

"Chronic pain spans a multitude of conditions, presents in different ways, and requires an individualized, multifaceted approach."-Dr. David B. Reuben Panel chair and professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles

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6 Steps to Help Lower Your Cancer Risk

Cancer is often unpredictable, but there are things everyone can do to help reduce their cancer risk or improve their chances of beating the disease if they do get it.

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Stay Warm And Avoid Frostbite With Tips From Dermatologists

Depending on how long and how frozen the tissue, frostbite can result in severe, sometimes permanent, damage.

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Century-Old Drug Reverses Autism-like Symptoms in Fragile X Mouse Model

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect 1 to 2 percent of children in the United States. Hundreds of genetic and environmental factors have been shown to increase the risk of ASD.

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CDC: Only 1 Patient Has Fully Beaten Puzzling Polio-Like Illness

Only one of more than 100 US children who were struck by an unexplained polio-like illness causing limb weakness in recent months has fully recovered.

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Five Secrets for Quitting Smoking in 2015

If this is your year to quit, the American Lung Association shares five tips to help you on the path to success.

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AIDSinfo Releases Drug App for iOS and Android Devices

AIDSinfo, a collaboration of the US Department of Health and Human Services and the US National Library of Medicine, announces the release of a new app, the AIDSinfo Drug App.

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Feeling Stressed?

Winter holidays-do they fill you with joy or with worries about gift-giving and family gatherings?

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Despite Risks, Benzodiazepine Use Highest in Older People

Prescription use of benzodiazepines-a widely used class of sedative and anti-anxiety medications-increases steadily with age, despite the known risks for older people.

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Single-Pill Hepatitis C Treatment

If you have chronic hepatitis C and you've avoided treatment because it sounds so complicated, now's the time to reconsider.

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Full Health Effects of ‘Vaping’ Still Unknown

Jonathan Foulds, professor of public health sciences and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine, conducted a study of more than 3,500 former smokers who switched to e-cigarettes.

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H5N2, H5N8 Avian Flu Viruses Surface in US

US authorities today reported finding wild birds in Washington state infected with two different highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, H5N2 and H5N8.

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CDC Year in Review: “Mission: Critical”

The 10 most challenging public-health threats of 2014.

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UCLA Researcher Develops Robotic Surgery Technique to Treat Previously Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer

Pioneering method gives patients new hope to live cancer-free lives.

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Revised Health Preparedness Index Grades US at 7.4 out of 10

The report, billed as the most comprehensive of its kind, was released by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) in partnership with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and more than 35 other organizations.

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Secondhand Marijuana Smoke May Damage Blood Vessels as Much as Tobacco Smoke

Breathing secondhand marijuana smoke could damage your heart and blood vessels as much as secondhand cigarette smoke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014.

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Older Breast Cancer Patients Still Get Radiation Despite Limited Benefit

Women over the age of 70 who have certain early-stage breast cancers overwhelmingly receive radiation therapy despite published evidence that the treatment has limited benefit.

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NIAID/GSK Experimental Ebola Vaccine Appears Safe, Prompts Immune Response

An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it.

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FDA Approves Avastin for Advanced Ovarian Cancer

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Avastin (bevacizumab) as a treatment for ovarian cancer.

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Only 3 in 10 Americans with HIV Have Virus in Check

The HIV epidemic continues to threaten the health and well-being of many Americans - with more than one million people living with the disease in the U.S. and 50,000 new infections each year.

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New Online Calculator Estimates Cardiovascular Disease Risk

The new Healthy Heart Score developed by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) gives individuals an easy method to estimate their 20-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD).

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NIH Research Featured in National Geographic Channel Documentary on Sleep

The documentary, Sleepless in America, premieres on the National Geographic Channel on Sunday, November 30th at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

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Update on New Treatments for Liver Diseases

The December issues of AGA's journals - Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology - highlight important updates into treatments for two serious liver conditions.

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Mitral Valve Repair Following Heart Attack May Offer Patients Little To No Benefit

Routinely adding mitral valve repair to coronary artery bypass graft surgery for heart attack patients may not be warranted.

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Residential Treatment May Be First-Line Option for Opioid-Dependent Young Adults

Month-long residential program could be better than standard-of-care outpatient programs in helping young adults stay drug-free.

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Race, Hospital, Insurance Status Affect Lung Cancer Treatment

African Americans, Hispanics and those who receive care at a community hospital are all significantly less likely than other patients to receive treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer, according to a report in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology.

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People with Asthma May be at Significantly Higher Risk of Heart Attack

Recent asthma symptoms or asthma that requires daily medication may significantly raise the risk of heart attack.

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'Tis the Season to Indulge in Walnuts

UC Davis research finds walnuts slow prostate cancer growth, among other health benefits

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Heart Attack, Stroke: Survivors’ Care Needs May be Much Greater Than Experts Thought

Survivors' physical limitations rapidly increase over decade following heart attack and stroke; many face disability, depression and caregiver reliance.

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ACR: Proposed Medicare Lung Cancer Screening Coverage A Lifesaver for Seniors

Medicare's proposed computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening coverage would provide high-risk seniors with access to care that can save more lives than any cancer screening test in history.

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Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify First Steps in Formation of Pancreatic Cancer

Researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer.

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Allergy Sufferers are Allergic to Treatment More Often than You’d Think

Whether allergy sufferers have symptoms that are mild or severe, they really only want one thing: relief. So it's particularly distressing that the very medication they hope will ease symptoms can cause different, sometimes more severe, allergic responses.

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Heart Procedure Complications Reduced With Simple Tool

Every year in the U.S., 600,000 heart procedures are performed by threading thin tubes through patients' arteries to access their hearts.

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Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

The most common type of diabetes, called type 2 diabetes, can be prevented or delayed if you know what steps to take.

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Silence is Deadly: Combating the Epidemic of Viral Hepatitis

Silence=Death. That phrase was used by the advocacy group ACT UP to end the silence about the AIDS crisis in the United States. This is no less true for the issue of viral hepatitis.

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Lack Of Understanding About Insurance Could Lead To Poor Choices

They know less than they think they know. That's the finding of a recent study that evaluated people's confidence about choosing and using health insurance compared with their actual knowledge and skills.

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EVD-68 Cases Fading, But More Unexplained Neuro Illnesses

EV-D68 infections in children is continuing to fade, but another possibly related death has been reported, and the number of unexplained polio-like illnesses potentially linked to the virus has risen by 13.

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First Vaccine Licensed in the United States To Prevent Invasive Meningococcal Disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the approval of Trumenba.

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Some Home Blood Pressure Monitors Aren’t Accurate

More and more experts now recommend that people with high blood pressure regularly check their blood pressure at home.

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'Integrated Play Groups' Help Children With Autism

It's an often agonizing challenge facing any parent of a child with autism: How can I help my son or daughter socialize with his or her typically developing peers?

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Making Decisions About Breast Cancer Surgery

Most women with breast cancer have some type of surgery as part of their treatment. They often have choices to make about the type of surgery they will undergo.

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Study Identifies Best Way to Treat Neck Pain

Combination therapy appears most effective.

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Dietary Flavanols Reverse Age-Related Memory Decline

Findings strengthen link between specific brain region and normal memory decline.

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WHO: Large Ebola Vaccine Trials Could Start in January

Large clinical trials that would put Ebola vaccines in the arms of thousands of West Africans may begin as early as January, depending on the outcome of small preliminary trials under way now or soon to start.

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Study Reports Cosmetic Procedures Just as Safe for Elderly as Young

Older men and women who choose to undergo cosmetic procedures remain safe and have complications at a rate no different than their younger counterparts, according to a recent study.

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Lessons From The ‘Spanish Flu,’ Nearly 100 Years Later

Just in time for flu season, a new Michigan State University study of "the mother of all pandemics" could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases.

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Study: CPAP Use For Sleep Apnea Does Not Negatively Impact Sexual Quality Of Life

Patients who use a CPAP device often believe that it makes them less sexually attractive, according to researchers at Rosalind Franklin University.

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High-Fat Meals Could Be More Harmful to Males Than Females

Male and female brains are not equal when it comes to the biological response to a high-fat diet.

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RA Patients’ Readmission Rates After Joint Replacement Are Rising

Rheumatoid arthritis patients who have undergone a hip or knee replacement are more likely to be readmitted to a hospital than are patients with osteoarthritis.

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For Men, Eating More Fruits and Vegetables Improves Sperm Function in IVF, but Consumption of Pesticide Residues Harm Sperm

At the 70th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital present their findings.

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Unveiling Another Secret of Aging

Although it had long been suspected that obesity ages a person faster, it hadn't been possible to prove the theory until now.

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CDC Develops a New, Faster Lab Test for Enterovirus D68

Confirmed cases will appear to rise as agency accelerates specimen testing; Changes in case counts due to faster testing will not represent a real-time influx of new cases.

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Brain Surgery Through the Cheek

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate - invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period.

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MD Anderson Study First to Compare Treatments, Survival Benefits for Early-Stage Lung Cancer

Removal of the entire lobe of lung may offer patients with early-stage lung cancer better overall survival when compared with a partial resection.

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CDC to Deploy Ebola Response Team to Help Hospitals

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has established an Ebola response team to immediately deploy to any hospital that has a confirmed Ebola patient.

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Cold, Flu, or Allergy?

You're feeling pretty lousy. You've got sniffles, sneezing, and a sore throat. Is it a cold, flu, or allergies?

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Body Contouring After Bariatric Surgery Helps Obese Patients

Patients who have plastic surgery to reshape their bodies after bariatric procedures are able to maintain "significantly greater" weight loss than those who do not.

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Teenage Baseball Pitchers at Risk for Permanent Shoulder Injury

Young baseball pitchers who throw more than 100 pitches per week are at risk for a newly identified overuse injury.

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Living Near Major Roads May Increase Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

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The End of Antibiotics? Researchers Warn of Critical Shortages

Many of the major players like Pfizer, Eli Lilly, AstraZeneca and Bristol-Myers Squibb are no longer developing antibiotics.

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Splints Placed Improperly In 93% of Suspected Pediatric Fractures Treated In Emergency Rooms/Urgent Care Centers

University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers found improper splinting often caused swelling and skin problems.

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FDA Approves First Combination Pill To Treat Hepatitis C

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Harvoni (ledipasvir and sofosbuvir) to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection.

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EV-D68 Cases Show Signs of Slowing

The growth in the number of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) cases showed a possible sign of slowing today.

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2015 Medicare Part B Premiums and Deductibles to Remain the Same

Premiums, copays and deductibles for other Medicare programs for 2015 also announced

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The Dwindling Stock Of Antibiotics, And What To Do About It

Pharmaceutical industry has withdrawn from the ‘antibiotic space.' Is it time for research universities to step in?

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What We Know About Transmission Of The Ebola Virus Among Humans

Ebola situation assessment - World Health Organization (WHO)

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Sesame Street Teaches Physicians a Lesson

Incarceration plays a major role in health and health disparities in the United States, says UC Riverside's Scott Allen

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Sleeping in Dentures Doubles the Risk of Pneumonia in the Elderly

Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly.

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Role of EV-D68 in Polio-Like Illnesses Still Unclear

As the nationwide outbreak of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) infections grew again today, federal and state health officials said they still have no idea whether the virus is contributing to a number of prolonged polio-like illnesses that have cropped up in a few states, especially California and Colorado.

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‘Mini-Stroke’ May Lead to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

A "mini-stroke" may increase your risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

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Family Therapy For Anorexia More Effective Than Individual Therapy, Researchers Find

Family-based therapy, in which parents of adolescents with anorexia nervosa are enlisted to interrupt their children's disordered behaviors, is twice as effective as individual psychotherapy at producing full remission of the disease.

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New Study Links Socioeconomic Factors and Fashion Trends Over the Past Century to Increased Incidence of Melanoma

A century's worth of cultural and historical forces have contributed to the rise in the incidence of melanoma, including changes in fashion and clothing design.

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Support Network Helps People Living With Heart Disease, Stroke

Do you know where to go for help after you've had a stroke, been diagnosed with heart disease or learn your baby was born with a congenital heart defect?

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WHO Experts Flesh Out Ebola Vaccine Plans

A World Health Organization (WHO) expert group met this week to map out the quickest way to get an Ebola virus disease (EVD) vaccine into West Africa's epidemic response arsenal, focusing on two experimental vaccines that already have clinical-grade vials ready for human trials.

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‘Skin-Like’ Device Monitors Cardiovascular and Skin Health

A new wearable medical device can quickly alert a person if they are having cardiovascular trouble or if it's simply time to put on some skin moisturizer, reports a Northwestern University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign study.

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CDC and Texas Health Department Confirm First Ebola Case Diagnosed in the U.S.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed today, through laboratory tests, the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States.

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Drug Addiction Viewed More Negatively Than Mental Illness, Johns Hopkins Study Shows

People are significantly more likely to have negative attitudes toward those dealing with drug addiction than those with mental illness, a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests, and generally don't support insurance, housing, and employment policies that benefit those dependent on drugs.

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Despite what You’ve Heard, Kids with Egg Allergies Should Get the Flu Shot

If you have a child with egg allergies you may have been told they shouldn't get the shot because of a possible reaction to the trace amounts of egg in the vaccine. Not true, says the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

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Antioxidant Found in Grapes Uncorks New Targets for Acne Treatment

Got grapes? UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne.

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The Fine Line Between Breast Cancer and Normal Tissues

Up to 40 percent of patients undergoing breast cancer surgery require additional operations because surgeons may fail to remove all the cancerous tissue in the initial operation. However, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have successfully tested a tool they developed that will help surgeons better distinguish cancerous breast tissue from normal tissue.

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FDA Panel Calls for More Research on Testosterone Therapy

Advisors to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported that additional research is needed to determine if testosterone therapy causes an increased risk for heart attacks and stroke.

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Common Painkillers Tied to Blood Clot Risk

People who use painkillers called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be at increased risk for potentially deadly blood clots, a new study suggests.

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Most Breast Cancer Patients Who Had Healthy Breast Removed at Peace with Decision

More women with cancer in one breast are opting to have both breasts removed to reduce their risk of future cancer.

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Alzheimer's Patients Can Still Feel the Emotion Long After the Memories Have Vanished

A new University of Iowa study further supports an inescapable message: caregivers have a profound influence-good or bad-on the emotional state of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

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Genetics of the 2014 Ebola Outbreak

Scientists used genomic sequencing technologies to identify the origin and track transmission of the Ebola virus in the current outbreak in Africa.

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Study Warns Swift Action Needed to Curb Exponential Climb in Ebola Outbreak

Unless Ebola control measures in west Africa are enhanced quickly, experts from the WHO and Imperial College, London, predict numbers will continue to climb exponentially.

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Mothers of Children With Autism Less Likely to Have Taken Iron Supplements During Pregnancy

Five-fold greater risk found in children whose mothers had low supplemental iron and other risk factors for delivering a child with ASD.

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Rules Changing for Some Pain Medicine Prescriptions

If you take a prescription pain medicine that includes the drug hydrocodone, the way you get your prescriptions is about to change. And many people with cancer take these medicines.

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Online Ratings Influence Parents’ Choices of Physicians for Their Children

U-M research shows almost three-quarters of parents aware of physician-rating Web sites, about a quarter have used them to select children's docs.

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Exercise Boosts Tumor-fighting Ability of Chemotherapy, Penn Team Finds

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

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Large Study Reveals New Genetic Variants that Raise Risk for Prostate Cancer

In an analysis of genetic information among more than 87,000 men, a global team of scientists says it has found 23 new genetic variants - common differences in the genetic code -- that increase a man's risk for prostate cancer.

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Improved Risk Identification Will Aid Fertility Preservation in Young Male Cancer Patients

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study has identified the cumulative dose of a widely used class of chemotherapy drugs that leaves young male cancer patients at risk for impaired sperm production as adults.

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A Link Between Jacobsen Syndrome and Autism

A rare genetic disorder known as Jacobsen syndrome has been linked with autism, according to a recent joint investigation by researchers at San Diego State University and the University of California, San Diego.

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Dying In America Is Harder Than It Has To Be, IOM Advises

It is time for conversations about death to become a part of life. That is one of the themes of a 500-page report, titled "Dying In America," released Tuesday by the Institute of Medicine.

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Heart Disease Screening Recommendations For People 12-25

When healthcare providers screen people 12-25 years old for underlying congenital/genetic heart disease, there are 14 critical questions on personal and family medical history and specific aspects of the physical examination that should be included.

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To Curb Violent Tendencies, Start Young

Aggressive children are less likely to become violent criminals or psychiatrically troubled adults if they receive early intervention, says a new study based on more than two decades of research.

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Certain Form of Baldness Linked to Higher Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology reports men with a specific pattern of baldness have a 40% increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer.

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Genetics Reveals Patients Susceptible to Drug-Induced Pancreatitis

Doctors have discovered that patients with a particular genetic variation are four times more likely to develop pancreatitis if they are prescribed a widely used group of drugs.

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Bully Victims More Likely to Suffer Night Terrors and Nightmares

In a study published this week in Pediatrics, journal of the American Pediatric Association, Professor Dieter Wolke and Dr Suzet Tanya Lereya from the University of Warwick, found being bullied increases the risk for a category of sleep disorders known as parasomnias. These are sleep-related problems such as nightmares, night terrors or sleep walking.

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Study Sheds Light on Asthma and Respiratory Viruses

People with asthma often have a hard time dealing with respiratory viruses such as the flu or the common cold, and researchers have struggled to explain why.

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Potassium-Rich Foods Cut Stroke, Death Risks Among Older Women

Postmenopausal women who eat foods higher in potassium are less likely to have strokes and die than women who eat less potassium-rich foods, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke.

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Genetic “Hotspot” Linked to Endometrial Cancer Aggressiveness

Parents of twins often tell them apart through subtle differences such as facial expression, moles, voice tone and gait. Similarly, physicians treating women with endometrial cancer must be able to distinguish between different versions of this disease form that, on the surface, appear the same.

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Can Sleep Loss Affect Your Brain Size?

Sleep difficulties may be linked to faster rates of decline in brain volume, according to a study published in the September 3, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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You May Have to Watch What Your Fruits and Veggies Eat

"According to a new study, it appears that it's possible to have an allergic reaction to the antibiotic residue in foods.

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Scientists Spot Genetic Clues to Crohn's Disease

A new genetic discovery about Crohn's disease could lead to different ways to fight the bowel disorder, researchers report.

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Joint Research: Prescription Drug Overdose Deaths Lower in States With Legal Medical Marijuana

In states where it is legal to use medical marijuana to manage chronic pain and other conditions, the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower than in states where medical marijuana remains illegal, new research suggests.

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American Heart Association Issues E-Cigarette Recommendations: Reinforces Need for Tough Restrictions on Sales and Marketing to Youth

Washington, D. C., Aug. 25, 2014 - The American Heart Association issued new policy recommendations today on the use of e-cigarettes and their impact on tobacco-control efforts. The guidance was published in the association's journal, Circulation.

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Administration Takes Steps to Ensure Women’s Continued Access to Contraception Coverage, While Respecting Religious-Based Objections

The Administration took several steps to help ensure women, whose coverage is threatened, receive coverage for recommended contraceptive services at no additional cost, as they should be entitled to under the Affordable Care Act.  

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Back to School Tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics

Helpful back-to-school tips that will hopefully make the transition into a new school year a little easier for you and your child, courtesy of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Surviving Sepsis

Many people have never heard of sepsis, or they don't know what it is. But sepsis is one of the top 10 causes of disease-related death in the United States. The condition can arise suddenly and progress quickly, and it's often hard to recognize.

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Experimental ZMapp Treatment For Ebola Virus Has Roots At Johns Hopkins

The experimental treatment for the Ebola virus-the so-called "secret serum" being used to treat the two Americans aid workers and a Spanish missionary priest who contracted the disease-has its roots at Johns Hopkins, NBC News reported today.

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Fast Track For Primary Care Docs At One Calif. University

Some doctors in the state of California will soon be able to practice after three years of medical school instead of the traditional four. The American Medical Association is providing seed money for the effort in the form of a $1 million, five-year grant to the University of California at Davis.

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Despite Gains, Number of Teens Receiving HPV Vaccine Still 'Unacceptably Low'

The number of adolescents ages 13-17 who are receiving the HPV vaccine remains "unacceptably low," said CDC officials in a recent press release(www.cdc.gov). The announcement came as the agency released results from its 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen),(www.cdc.gov) which appeared July 25 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR),(www.cdc.gov)

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Clues to Curbing Obesity Found in Neuronal ‘Sweet Spot’

Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor from being activated in a small part of the brain, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers.

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Strokes: Women Strike Out

Most women know to call 911 if they think they are having a stroke, according to a national survey by the American Heart Association of more than 1,200 women, recently published in the journal Stroke. But here’s the catch: Most would not recognize the signs of a stroke if they actually had one.

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A Blood Test For Suicide?

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide.

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Expert Panel Recommends Sweeping Changes To Doctor Training System

An expert panel recommended Tuesday completely overhauling the way government pays for the training of doctors, saying the current $15 billion system is failing to produce the medical workforce the nation needs.

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Depression Treatment for Pregnant and Postpartum Women

Antidepressant Treatment of Depression During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period, a research review from AHRQ's Effective Health Care Program, has found there is not enough evidence to determine the relative benefits and harms of depression treatment in pregnant and postpartum women.

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Drug Improves Birth Rates for Women with Ovary Disorder

In a search for more effective ways to reverse PCOS infertility, some physicians have begun using the drug letrozole. Letrozol has been approved as a breast cancer treatment by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug is also known to suppress production of estrogen, which in turn triggers release of the hormones that drive ovulation.

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Capitol Hill Briefing Focuses on Economics of Comprehensive Diabetes Management

Efforts to figure out what treatment regimens work best for most patients - known as comparative effectiveness research, or CER - needs to be sensitive to the heterogeneity of people with diabetes, USC Professor Dana Goldman warned policymakers at a briefing on Capitol Hill.

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Nanosensor Device May Help Watch for Cancer From the Inside

A device just one nanometer in diameter, which can be inserted under the skin, may one day be able to signal the onset, progression, or spread of cancer, and alert doctors so they can take action more quickly

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Could a Simple Smell Test Help Spot Alzheimer's Early?

New research suggests that a faltering sense of smell might signal the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, and that an inexpensive, low-tech smell test could spot who needs more extensive screening for dementia.

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Researchers Find Early Predictor for Preeclampsia: Biomarker Can Determine Risk Just 6 Weeks Into Pregnancy

University of Iowa researchers have discovered a biomarker that could give expecting mothers and their doctors the first simple blood test to reliably predict that a pregnant woman may develop preeclampsia, at least as early as 6 weeks into the pregnancy.

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Hyperthermia: NIH Provides Advice on Heat-Related Illness for Older Adults

During the summer, it is important for everyone, especially older adults and people with chronic medical conditions, to be aware of the dangers of hyperthermia. The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the NIH, has some tips to help mitigate some of the dangers.

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CDC Report Shows Progress and Problems Among Foodborne Germs

Antibiotic resistance in foodborne germs, an ongoing public health threat, showed both positive and troubling trends, according to data tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2012. Each year, antibiotic-resistant infections from foodborne germs cause an estimated 430,000 illnesses in the United States. Multi-drug resistant Salmonella, from food and other sources, causes about 100,000 illnesses in the United States each year.

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All Medical Students and Physicians Need Training in Nutrition and Physical Activity to Help Combat America’s Obesity Epidemic

All medical students and physicians should be trained in nutrition and physical activity to help combat America's growing obesity challenge, according to a new white paper, which ndicates current training for medical professionals in nutrition and exercise is inadequate to cope with the nation's obesity epidemic.

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In Hairless Man, Arthritis Drug Spurs Hair Growth — Lots Of It

A man with almost no hair on his body has grown a full head of it after a novel treatment by doctors at Yale University.

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Ask Super Doctors - Dr. Richard W. Farnam

Why should women care about the new board certification in urogynecology?

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Drug Can Help You Avoid Infertility from Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy for young women with breast cancer has a serious permanent side effect: infertility due to irreversible damage to the ovaries. But a new study shows that a hormone-blocking drug taken during chemotherapy can help young female breast cancer patients avoid ovary damage and go on to have children later.

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FDA Approves First Implantable Wireless Device With Remote Monitoring

On Wednesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the CardioMEMS HF System, which measures the pulmonary artery (PA) pressures and heart rates of patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III heart failure who have been hospitalized for heart failure in the previous year. The device allows health care professionals to monitor the condition of their patients remotely.

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NIH Study Links High Cholesterol Levels to Lower Fertility

High cholesterol levels may impair fertility in couples trying to achieve a pregnancy, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the University at Buffalo (New York) and Emory University in Atlanta.

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New Survey Documents Women’s Health Care, Coverage, and Early Experiences with the Affordable Care Act

A comprehensive survey released May 15 by the Kaiser Family Foundation provides a snapshot of women and their health coverage and care during a time of transition as important Affordable Care Act insurance market changes began to take root.

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Mayo Clinic Trial Uses Measles Vaccine to Combat Cancer

In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy - destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues - can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal "Mayo Clinic Proceedings."

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Ask Super Doctors - Dr. Eric S. Schweiger

Did you know you don't have to live with acne and acne scars anymore?

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Screening May Help Boost Liver Cancer Survival Rates

Increased screening for liver tumors in people with cirrhosis -- scarring of the liver -- could help boost liver cancer survival rates, according to researchers.

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Specialized Yoga Program Could Help Women with Urinary Incontinence

In a study scheduled to be published on April 25, 2014 in Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery, the official journal of the American Urogynecologic Society, UCSF researchers discovered that a yoga training program, designed to improve pelvic health, can help women gain more control over their urination and avoid accidental urine leakage.“Yoga is often directed at mindful awareness, increasing relaxation, and relieving anxiety and stress,” said first author Alison Huang, MD, assistant professor in the UCSF School of Medicine. “For these reasons, yoga has been directed at a variety of other conditions – metabolic syndrome or pain syndromes – but there's also a reason to think that it could help for incontinence as well.”

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Multiple Births Don’t Have to be an Inevitable Result of Fertility Treatments

While fertility treatments have helped many people become parents, they commonly result in multiple births, increasing the risk of prematurity, and leading to lifelong complications. But this doesn't have to be the case, according to Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues, who recommend sweeping changes to policy and clinical practice in a study published in the April issue of Fertility & Sterility.

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Details -- And Limits -- Of Medicare Billing Data Emerge

News outlets begin to analyze the wealth of information now available as a result of Wednesday's release by the Centers of Medicare & Medicaid Services of a trove of payment records. They also note the limits. 

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Medicare Will Release Billing Data From Doctors

The information will include data on what services doctors used, the average amount they charged Medicare and what they were paid. Doctors have fought such disclosures in the past.

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American Academy of Ophthalmology Announces Launch of IRIS Registry

Quality care initiative combines the power of information technology with evidence-based medicine to improve patient outcomes

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Statins May Help Improve Men's Love Life

Men prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins may have an extra reason to take their medication, according to research linking statins to improved sexual function.

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FAQ: What Are The Penalties For Not Getting Insurance?

If you're uninsured, now's the time to buy a plan. March 31 is the end of the annual open enrollment period when people who don’t have coverage through their employers can sign up on or off their state’s marketplace

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Consistent Blood Pressure Control May Cut Rate Of Second Stroke In Half

Stroke survivors who consistently control their blood pressure may reduce the likelihood of a second stroke by more than half, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Stroke."

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Toddlers Who Sleep Less May Eat More

Toddlers who get too little sleep tend to eat more and are at increased risk for obesity, a new study indicates.

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Largest Nutritional Intervention Trial Of Cocoa Flavanols And Heart Health To Be Launched

In a novel collaboration, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), Seattle-based Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Mars, Incorporated plan to partner on the largest research trial to date that will investigate the heart health benefits of cocoa flavanols.

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Women In Their 60s Are About Twice As Likely To Develop Alzheimer's Disease Over The Rest Of Their Lives As They Are Breast Cancer

According to the Alzheimer's Association 2014 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report released today, a woman’s estimated lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s at age 65 is 1 in 6, compared with nearly 1 in 11 for a man.

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Study: Alzheimer’s Disease A Much Larger Cause Of Death Than Reported

A new study suggests that Alzheimer's disease may contribute to close to as many deaths in the United States as heart disease or cancer. 

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Next Step For Smart Phones: Keeping Tabs On Patients

Dr. Eric Topol, a cardiologist at the Scripps Clinic in San Diego, knows when his patients’ hearts are racing or their blood pressure is on the rise, even if they’re sitting at home.

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New Autism Definition May Decrease Diagnoses By One Third

New diagnosis guidelines for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) issued by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) may reduce by almost one third the total number of  people being diagnosed, according to research from Columbia University School of Nursing.

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New Knees, Hips May Also Help The Heart

A knee or hip joint replacement may provide a surprising benefit: better heart health.

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Prevalence Of Allergies The Same, Regardless Of Where You Live

In the largest, most comprehensive, nationwide study to examine the prevalence of allergies from early childhood to old age, scientists from the National Institutes of Health report that allergy prevalence is the same across different regions of the United States, except in children 5 years and younger.

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Schools Add More Fruits, Veggies To The '3 Rs'

Under new U.S. guidelines on school lunches, low-income students are eating more fruits and vegetables, according to a new study.

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Can Infant Sleep Machines Be Hazardous to Babies’ Ears?

Infant sleep machines can be used to mask environmental noises in busy households or to provide ambient noise to soothe an infant during sleep, but they can also contribute to babies’ hearing loss.

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Fever In 1st Trimester Might Raise Risk Of Birth Defects

Babies born to women who suffer a fever early in pregnancy may have a slightly increased risk of certain birth defects, a new review finds.

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Dealing With Dimensia - When Thinking and Behavior Decline

Forgetfulness, confusion, or having trouble remembering a name or word can be a normal part of life. But when thinking problems or unusual behavior starts to interfere with everyday activities—such as working, preparing meals, or handling finances—it’s time to see a doctor.

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Dermatologists Advise Patients That Over-The-Counter Acne Products Can Have Benefits And A Place On Their Medicine Shelf

Acne can come and go throughout one’s life, from the teen years all the way through middle age.

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Kidney Failure Risk for Organ Donors 'Extremely Low'

The risk of a kidney donor developing kidney failure in the remaining organ is much lower than in the population at large, even when compared with people who have two kidneys, according to results of new Johns Hopkins research.

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New Guidelines For Reducing Stroke Risks Unique To Women

For the first time, guidelines have been developed for preventing stroke in women.

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Regular Aspirin Use May Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

Women who take aspirin daily may reduce their risk of ovarian cancer by 20 percent, according to a study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

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HHS Funds Drug For Bioterrorism, Antimicrobial-Resistant Infections

A new drug to help protect the public against two bioterrorism threats and provide a new option to treat antibiotic-resistant infections will advance in development under a public-private partnership, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) announced today.

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Fewer Than Half of Women Attend Recommended Doctors Visits After Childbirth

Medical associations widely recommend that women visit their obstetricians and primary care doctors shortly after giving birth, but slightly fewer than half make or keep those postpartum appointments, according to a study by Johns Hopkins researchers.

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New Substance Abuse Treatment Resources Focus on Teens

Guide on treating teen substance abuse and online education for healthcare providers now available.

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Kids Unlikely To Outgrow 'Baby Fat'

Baby fat may not be as cute as it looks, new research suggests.

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Video Game Teaches Kids About Stroke Symptoms And Calling 9-1-1

Children improved their understanding of stroke symptoms and what to do if they witness a stroke after playing a 15-minute stroke education video game, according to new research reported in the American Heart Association journal, "Stroke."

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Current H7N9 Wave Rivals Last Spring's Case Total

China's steady rise in H7N9 avian flu cases continued over the past 3 days, with 14 new cases from five provinces, as the latest test results in poultry showed a conflicting picture of the virus on farms, including positive samples found today in birds sent to Hong Kong.

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Consumers Expecting Free 'Preventive' Care Sometimes Surprised By Charges

The new health-care law encourages people to get the preventive services they need by requiring that most health plans cover cancer screenings, contraceptives and vaccines, among other things, without charging patients anything out of pocket.

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Surgeon General report says 5.6 million U.S. children will die prematurely unless current smoking rates drop

Approximately 5.6 million American children alive today – or one out of every 13 children under age 18 – will die prematurely from smoking-related diseases unless current smoking rates drop, according to a new Surgeon General’s report.

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Genes May Be to Blame for Hard-to-Handle Toddlers

DNA might be a key factor in excessive physical aggression in toddlers, a new Canadian study suggests.

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Media Focus On Obesity May Backfire For Some Women

Feeling a little fat after the holidays? Beware. Reading a news story that seems to devalue people who are overweight might make you more likely to reach for snacks to soothe your anxiety.

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A Burning Issue - Handling Household Burns

Accidental burns can happen just about anywhere in your home, and they’re not always caused by fire.

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FDA Asks Doctors to Stop Prescribing Drugs That Contain More Than 325 Milligrams of Acetaminophen

FDA is recommending health care professionals discontinue prescribing and dispensing prescription combination drug products that contain more than 325 milligrams (mg) of acetaminophen per tablet, capsule or other dosage unit.

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Keck Medicine Physicians Become First To Implant Epilepsy Controlling Device

Keck Medicine of USC has become the world’s first medical center to implant a responsive brain device newly approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat epilepsy. It has the potential to help millions of people worldwide.

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Food Companies Cut 6.4 Trillion Calories From Supermarket Shelves: Report

Major food companies are keeping their word by removing 6.4 trillion calories from the U.S. marketplace in an effort to promote healthy weight, a new report says.

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Personalized Medicine - Matching Treatments To Your Genes

Wouldn’t it be nice if treatments and preventive care could be designed just for you?

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Shingles Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke in Young Adults

Having shingles may increase the risk of having a stroke years later, according to research published in the January 2, 2014, online issue of "Neurology," the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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2013 Top 10 Advances In Heart Disease And Stroke Science

New prevention guidelines, programs to control blood pressure, getting more people to access cardiac rehab services and a possible link between digestive bacteria and heart disease risk are included in a recap of last year’s top cardiovascular and stroke advances identified by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

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Anxiety linked to higher long-term risk of stroke

The greater your anxiety level, the higher your risk of having a stroke, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal, "Stroke."

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Study Reveals New Targets for Parkinson's Disease

Scientists used a novel approach to identify dozens of genes that may contribute to Parkinson’s disease.

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Protect Yourself Against HPV - Block This Cancer-Causing Virus

More than half of all sexually active people get a genital infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) at some point in their lives, but most never know it.

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Administration takes steps to ensure Americans signing up through the Marketplace have coverage and access to the care they need on January 1

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced additional steps to help ensure consumers who are seeking health insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace smoothly transition to coverage that best fits their needs.

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Three major smoking cessation therapies pose no serious heart risks

Three major types of smoking cessation therapies don’t increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart-related death, according to research published in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation."

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U.S. stroke deaths declining due to improved prevention, treatment

Stroke deaths in the United States have declined dramatically in recent decades due to improved treatment and prevention, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

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ACC Names First Hospitals Participating in Patient Navigator Program

With increased penalties in effect for hospitals with excessive readmissions for heart attack and heart failure, the ACC is launching a program that applies a team approach to keeping patients at home and healthy after discharge.

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U.S. Pregnancy Rates Continue to Fall

Pregnancy rates continue to decline in the United States, a federal report released Thursday shows.

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'Healthy Obesity' Is a Myth, Report Says

The notion that some people can be overweight or obese and still remain healthy is a myth, according to a new Canadian study.

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Understanding Breast Cancer - Early Detection, Improved Treatments Save Lives

More women are beating breast cancer these days, in part because of improved treatments and screening. When abnormal tissue or cancer is found in its early stages, it may be easier to treat.

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Ask Super Doctors - Dr. Ron Noy

Why do ACL patients recover quicker and better than before?

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Many Pediatricians Feel Uncomfortable Providing Care to Kids with Genetic Conditions

Many primary care pediatricians say they feel uncomfortable providing health care to patients with genetic disorders.

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Human Error Usually the Cause of Lack of Oxygen During Childbirth

Human error is the most common cause of infant asphyxiation at birth, according to a new Norwegian study.

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Children’s cardiovascular fitness declining worldwide

Many kids don’t run as far or fast as their parents did, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

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Device May Help Doctors Diagnose Lethal Heart Rhythm in Womb

A promising technology may enable doctors to diagnose and possibly treat in utero a common cause of stillbirth and sudden death in infants, according to research published in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation."

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Ask Super Doctors - Dr. Eric M. Haas

Did you know you can have colon surgery without a visible scar?

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HANYS Issues Report On Hospital Report Cards

The Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS) issued a unique report that evaluates ten prominent government, not-for-profit, and for-profit hospital report cards. HANYS' review found a wide variation in the methodologies and results.

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A Simple Blood Test May Catch Early Pancreatic Cancer

Reporting on a small preliminary study, Johns Hopkins researchers say a simple blood test based on detection of tiny epigenetic alterations may reveal the earliest signs of pancreatic cancer, a disease that is nearly always fatal because it isn’t usually discovered until it has spread to other parts of the body.

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Study of Twins Shows How Smoking Ages the Face

A study comparing the faces of identical twins confirms what many smokers fear -- the habit does prematurely age a person's skin, taking a serious toll on looks even after just five years.

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Overuse Injuries May Rise When Kids Specialize in One Sport

Children and teens who spend twice as much time playing organized sports -- especially a single sport -- than they do in free play are more likely to be injured, according to new research.

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Autism Spectrum Disorder - Uncovering Clues to a Complicated Condition

NIH-funded scientists have been working to uncover the secrets of autism.

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Skill Ratings Predict Which Surgeons Perform Safer Surgeries

University of Michigan health system study shows wide variation in surgeons' skills.

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Gene May Explain Link Between Meat and Colon Cancer Risk

A specific genetic variant might help explain why eating red and processed meat is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer, a small, new study contends.

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Study Probes Why Truckers Use Booze, Illicit Drugs

Studies of substance abuse by truckers show varying results, but at least some drivers turn to alcohol or illicit drugs while behind the wheel, a new review finds.

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Unlocking the Schoolyard Gates

Opening school playgrounds and indoor spaces to communities can help young people be more active.

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National Survey Finds Most Americans Misunderstand Miscarriage

The majority of Americans inaccurately believe miscarriage is rare and misunderstand its causes, creating an often isolating and guilt-ridden experience for those who experience it. These are the findings in the first-ever national survey to assess attitudes and perceptions towards miscarriage, which was conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.

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One in Six People Worldwide Will Have a Stroke in Their Lifetime

A new survey commissioned by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association found that many people who care for family or friends at high risk for stroke don’t know the potentially life-saving warning signs.

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NIH To Fund Development of Three Co-Robots

Three projects have been awarded funding by the National Institutes of Health to develop innovative robots that work cooperatively with people and adapt to changing environments to improve human capabilities and enhance medical procedures.

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Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease at Higher Risk for Stroke and Heart Attack

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at an increased risk of stroke and heart attack according to a new study presented by Mayo Clinic researchers at the American College of Gastroenterology's Annual Scientific Meeting, Oct. 11–16, in San Diego.

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American Heart Association creates next generation of lifesavers

Classroom-tested kit empowers educators to teach hundreds of students CPR.

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Naps Can Help Preschool Children Learn

Classroom naps can enhance memory and support learning in preschool children, a new study showed. The results might help educators make informed decisions about allotting time for naps in preschools.

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FDA Investigating Leukemia Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating an increasing frequency of reports of serious and life-threatening blood clots and severe narrowing of blood vessels (arteries and veins) of patients taking the leukemia chemotherapy drug Iclusig (ponatinib).

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Weight Loss Surgery May Increase Painkiller Dependence

Obese people taking narcotics for chronic pain actually increased their use of prescription painkillers following bariatric surgery intended to reduce their weight and relieve their pain, a new study shows.

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BYU Study: How Depression Blurs Memories

To pinpoint why depression messes with memory, researchers took a page from Sesame Street's book.

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Healthcare providers should aggressively treat unhealthy lifestyles

Healthcare providers should treat unhealthy behaviors as aggressively as they treat high blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart disease risk factors, according to an American Heart Association science advisory published in "Circulation."

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Scientists Use DNA to Determine Marital Satisfaction

What makes some people more prone to wedded bliss or sorrow than others? Researchers at UC Berkeley and Northwestern University have found a major clue in our DNA. A gene involved in the regulation of serotonin can predict how much our emotions affect our relationships, according to a new study that may be the first to link genetics, emotions, and marital satisfaction.

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Colon Cancer Hits Younger Adults Especially Hard, Study Finds

Younger adults with colorectal cancer that has spread (metastasized) to other areas of the body have a higher risk of disease progression and death than middle-aged patients, a new study finds.

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Should You Take Dietary Supplements? A Look at Vitamins, Minerals, Botanicals and More

When you reach for that bottle of vitamin C or fish oil pills, you might wonder how well they’ll work and if they’re safe. The first thing to ask yourself is whether you need them in the first place.

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FDA-Approved Antidepressant May Combat Deadly Form of Lung Cancer

A little-used class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating a particularly deadly form of lung cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Increased competion in new Health Insurance Marketplace leads to more affordable consumer options

A new report released by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) finds that in state after state, consumers will see increased competition in the Health Insurance Marketplace, leading to new and affordable choices for consumers.

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New vaccine eliminates AIDS virus in monkeys

An experimental vaccine given to monkeys triggered a lasting immune attack that eliminated all traces of an AIDS-causing virus after a year or more. The finding points to a possible new strategy in the search for an effective AIDS vaccine.

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Marriage associated with better cancer outcomes, study finds

People who are married when diagnosed with cancer live longer than those who are not, report researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital.

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Need Steriods? Maybe Not For Lower Back Pain

New research from Johns Hopkins suggests that it may not be the steroids in spinal shots that provide relief from lower back pain, but the mere introduction of any of a number of fluids, such as anesthetics and saline, to the space around the spinal cord.

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Can Vitamin B Supplements Help Stave Off Stroke?

New evidence suggests that taking vitamin B supplements may help reduce the risk of stroke. The research appears in the September 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®

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Obama Administration Announces Effort to Protect Consumers in the Health Insurance Marketplace

Today, Attorney General Eric Holder, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairwoman Edith Ramirez met at the White House to kick off a comprehensive interagency initiative to prevent, protect against, and, where necessary, prosecute consumer fraud and privacy violations in the Health Insurance Marketplace.

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CPAP therapy provides beauty sleep for people with sleep apnea

A new study suggests that people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are perceived to appear more alert, more youthful and more attractive after at least two months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy.

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CDC Reports Superbugs Are Growing Threat

Antibiotic resistance is a quickly growing, extremely dangerous problem. World health leaders have described antibiotic-resistant bacteria as "nightmare bacteria" that "pose a catastrophic threat" to people in every country in the world.

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High blood pressure reading in kids linked to triple risk for condition as adults

Children with one or more high blood pressure readings were about three times more likely to develop the condition as adults, in a study presented at the American Heart Association High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions 2013.

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The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Releases Choosing Wisely® List

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) released a list of specific tests or procedures that are commonly ordered but not always necessary in orthopaedics as part of the "Choosing Wisely®" campaign, an initiative of the ABIM Foundation.

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FDA approves Botox Cosmetic to improve the appearance of crow’s feet

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new use for Botox Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the temporary improvement in the appearance of moderate to severe lines, known as crow's feet, in adults.

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Research Treats The Fungus Among Us With Nontoxic Medicinal Compound

A Kansas State University microbiologist has found a breakthrough herbal medicine treatment for a common human fungal pathogen that lives in almost 80 percent of people.

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New Joint Commission Video Offers Advice on Medical Care at Home

A new Joint Commission Speak Up™ video, “Speak Up: at Home," released today, shows people who need medical care at home how to make the most of their experience and protect their health. 

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Successful blood pressure control program developed in California

A large-scale program for controlling high blood pressure in a California health care system could help pave the way for improving blood pressure control in the general population.

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Consumers With Serious Medical Problems Need To Carefully Assess Total Plan Costs

One of the health care overhaul's most far-reaching provisions prohibits health plans from refusing to cover people who are sick or charging them higher premiums. Still, for people with serious medical conditions, the online health insurance marketplaces present new wrinkles that could have significant financial impact.

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U.S. Faces Cancer-Care Crisis, Report Suggests

The United States faces a cancer care crisis because of its aging population, rising health costs, complexity of care and a shrinking pool cancer care workers, a new report warns.

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Blood may hold clues for identifying suicide risk

Scientists identified signs in blood that might help doctors identify people with suicidal feelings and thoughts. The discovery could lead to more effective interventions.

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Fans of losing football teams turn to junk food for consolation

In a series of studies, researchers found that both U.S. football and French soccer fans seem to consume extra fat and sugar in the wake of their favorite team's loss. Experts said depressed fans may be using comfort food as a way to deal with their emotions -- a tactic familiar to many people, sports lovers or not.

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Study Estimates Costs of Health Care-Associated Infections

A study estimates that total annual costs for five major health care-associated infections (HAIs) were $9.8 billion, with surgical site infections contributing the most to overall costs, according to a report published by "JAMA Internal Medicine," a JAMA Network publication.

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CDC finds 200,000 heart disease and stroke deaths could be prevented

More than 200,000 preventable deaths from heart disease and stroke occurred in the United States in 2010, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Too Much Weight Gain During Pregnancy Increases Complication Risks

A variety of factors can make it difficult for women to maintain a healthy weight during pregnancy. But recent NICHD supported research affirms the importance of not gaining too much weight during pregnancy to reduce the risk for complications.

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New FDA-approved Defibrillator Works Without Wires

A new type of defibrillator implanted under the skin can detect dangerously abnormal heart rhythms and deliver shocks to restore a normal heartbeat without wires touching the heart, according to research in the American Heart Association journal, "Circulation."

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The Healthy Young America Video Contest

This Fall, many young Americans will have more health insurance options available to them than ever before as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) begins allowing individuals to enroll in new subsidized health insurance plans. Young Invincibles and the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services have created a competition...

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Spinal Fluid Test May Aid Early Detection of Parkinson's Disease

Testing for certain proteins in spinal fluid may help doctors diagnose Parkinson's disease earlier and determine how fast the movement disorder is likely to advance, according to new research.

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American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Warns Consumers

Over the last few years, there has been explosive growth in non-surgical cosmetic procedures, often performed in retail or spa-like settings. Unlike physician offices where clinicians oversee the treatment and maintain medical records...

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Scientists Find Hope in Potential Malaria Vaccine

A candidate malaria vaccine is safe and protects against infection in adults, according to the results of an early-stage clinical trial.

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Regular Fruit Consumption May Prevent Vascular Diseases

Eating more fruit may decrease your risk of suffering a dangerous vascular condition, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation." In a Swedish study, people who reported eating more than two servings of fruit daily had a lower risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm than those who ate the least amount of fruit.

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Heart Failure Survival May Get Boost From Doctor's Visit

One way for recently discharged heart failure patients to boost their survival odds is to see a doctor within the first month after leaving the hospital, a new study finds.

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Stay Cool - Getting Too Hot Can Be Dangerous

Many people love the warm summer months. But hot and humid days can sometimes be dangerous.

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Eyes may someday reveal stroke risk

In a study reported in the American Heart Association journal "Hypertension," researchers said retinal imaging may someday help assess if you’re more likely to develop a stroke — the nation’s No. 4 killer and a leading cause of disability.

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U.S. couples' infertility rates declining

Despite the rise in fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization, infertility rates have actually decreased among U.S. women of childbearing age, a government report released Wednesday shows.

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Hospital agrees to put 15-year-old on transplant list

Anthony Stokes will get a chance at a new heart. According to Stokes' family, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston reversed course this afternoon and has agreed to add the 15-year-old to its donor list. The decision comes days after the hospital officials sent the family a letter saying Anthony would not be a good candidate for transplant because he had a "history of non-compliance."

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American Medical News to be discontinued

The American Medical Association announced today that it will stop publishing "American Medical News"effective Sept. 9, 2013. AMA officials cited the decline of the business model for newspapers, including declining advertising revenues and the ongoing migration of readers to online and digital platforms as driving forces behind the decision.

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Eating Fish May Be Tied to Lower Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk: Study

Women who regularly get some fish in their diet may have a relatively lower risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, a large new study suggests.

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Outgoing young people tend to be happier later in life

People who were outgoing and energetic as young adults seem to be happier with their lives by the time they hit retirement age, a new study suggests.

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College football players more likely to develop high blood pressure

College football players, especially linemen, may develop high blood pressure over the course of their first season, according to a small study in the American Heart Association’s journal "Circulation."

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New no-smoking law leads to fewer ambulance calls

When smoking was banned from casinos in Colorado, ambulance calls to casinos in Gilpin County dropped about 20 percent, according to research reported in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation."

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Scientists use stem cells to create working blood vessels

Scientists directed human stem cells to form networks of tiny blood vessels that can connect to the existing circulation in mice. The finding might assist future efforts to repair and regenerate tissues and organs, which need an adequate blood supply to grow and survive.

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Need for State Smoke-Free Laws Verified by New CDC Study

American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments today on the CDC Foundation's new study released in the journal "Preventing Chronic Disease," which found smoke-free laws in nine states had no impact on restaurant and bar revenue.

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Over Past Decade, U.S. Breastfeeding Rates Are Continuing to Rise

Breastfeeding rates have continued to rise over the past decade, according to data released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The percent of babies breastfeeding at six months increased from 35 percent in 2000 to 49 percent in 2010...

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Herbal Supplement Use and Cosmetic Surgery Risk

Preoperative evaluations before facial cosmetic surgery find that about half of patients are taking herbal and other supplements, reports a study in the July issue of "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®", the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Kidney Transplant Rejection Now Easier to Detect

Levels of certain molecules in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can provide an early sign of transplant rejection, researchers found. The noninvasive urine test could allow doctors to intervene early and protect transplanted kidneys.

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Delay in seeking stroke care costs women best treatment

Women with clot-caused strokes are less likely than men to arrive at the hospital in time to receive the best treatment, according to a European study reported in the American Heart Association journal "Stroke."

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Skipping breakfast may increase coronary heart disease risk

Here’s more evidence why breakfast may be the most important meal of the day.

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Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments

As the number of people diagnosed with diabetes continues to grow, illegally sold products promising to prevent, treat, and even cure diabetes are flooding the marketplace.

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Brain Wave Test Could Help Detect ADHD

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of the first medical device based on brain function to help assess attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years old. When used as part of a complete medical and psychological examination, the device can help confirm an ADHD diagnosis or a clinician's decision that further diagnostic testing should focus on ADHD or other medical or behavioral conditions that produce symptoms similar to ADHD.

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Children Exposed to Anti-HIV Drugs in the Womb Do Not Have Increased Risk of Language Delays

he combinations of anti-HIV drugs recommended for pregnant women do not appear in general to increase their children's risk for language delay, according to a study from a National Institutes of Health research network.

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Elevated blood pressure increasing among children, adolescents

The risk of elevated blood pressure among children and adolescents rose 27 percent during a thirteen-year period, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Hypertension."

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American Academy of Ophthalmology Announces Plans for the Nation’s First Comprehensive Eye Disease Patient Database

In an effort to improve the quality of care for patients requiring medical and surgical care for vision loss, the American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced its plans to implement the nation's first comprehensive eye disease patient database.

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Uninsured Americans gaining affordable health coverage under new $150 million grant

Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced $150 million in grant awards to 1,159 health centers across the nation to enroll uninsured Americans in new health coverage options made available by the Affordable Care Act.  Speaking at the Mountain Park Health Center in Phoenix, Ariz., later in the day the Secretary noted that, with these funds, health centers are expected to hire an additional 2,900 outreach and eligibility assistance workers to assist millions of people nationwide with enrollment into affordable health coverage.

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PET-Scans May Lead to Successful Depression Treatment Plans

A brain imaging technique may help predict whether people with major depression will respond best to treatment with psychotherapy or a commonly prescribed drug. The approach might eventually be used as a tool to identify treatments that are most likely to succeed.

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New Study: No Cognitive Decline for Postmenopausal Women Using Estrogen Therapy

"In contrast to findings in older postmenopausal women, this study tells women that taking these types of estrogen-based hormone therapies for a relatively short period of time in their early postmenopausal years may not put them at increased risk for cognitive decline over the long term," says co-author Dr. Susan Resnick of NIA. "Further, it is important to note that we did not find any cognitive benefit after long-term follow-up."

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Coping With The Diagnosis of Childhood Cancer

Just the thought of a child getting cancer can be frightening and overwhelming. But while cancer can be life threatening, there’s encouraging news.

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Scientists Exploring How Aspirin May Guard Against Cancer

Aspirin and related drugs may fight cancer by lowering rates of DNA mutation, a small new study suggests.

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Study reveals teen girls with HPV vaccine have lower HPV infection rates

A new study looking at the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in girls and women before and after the introduction of the HPV vaccine shows a significant reduction in vaccine-type HPV in U.S. teens.

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$32 million in grants from HHS awarded to help get health coverage to children

Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced nearly $32 million in grants for efforts to identify and enroll children eligible for Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). 

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A tick’s spit leads to an entire lesson in blood clotting

There really is such a thing as tick spit – that is, the saliva of a tick. And there’s something about it that might help fight heart disease and stroke.

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Stimulating Brain May Help Stroke Survivors Recover Language

Non-invasive brain stimulation may help stroke survivors recover speech and language function, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Stroke."

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Persons with an egg allergy are recommended by the CDC Advisory Committee to get the influenza vaccine option, FluBlok

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted today, 13 to 0, in favor of recommending FluBlok during the 2013-2014 influenza season for vaccination of persons 18 through 49 years of age with egg allergy of any severity.

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Fetal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Tied to Hearing Loss in Teens

Add another hazard to the long list of reasons not to smoke during pregnancy: Children exposed to tobacco smoke in the womb may be at higher risk for hearing loss.

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A Bang to the Brain - What We Know About Concussions

Your brain is your body’s command center. Its soft, sensitive tissues float in a cushioning fluid within the hard and sturdy skull.

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A third of med students show bias against obese patients

There is widespread anti-obesity bias among medical students, although many are unaware of it, according to a study in the May issue of "Academic Medicine."

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Doctors urged to use 5-question tool to screen for frailty

A panel recommends that doctors screen all patients older than 70 for the condition, which affects 5% and 10% of those in that age group.

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Skipping Breakfast May Raise Diabetes Risk

Eating breakfast every day may help overweight women reduce their risk of diabetes, a small new study suggests.

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On Sound Footing - The Health of Your Feet

Your feet are pretty small, considering they have to support the entire height and weight of your body. But they can cause big problems. So pay some attention to your feet.

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Nationwide Shortage of Doxycycline: Resources for Providers and Recommendations for Patient Care

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) originally reported a shortage of some forms of doxycycline (doxycycline hyclate) and unavailability of tetracycline on January 18, 2013, caused by increased demand and manufacturing issues. FDA continues to report shortage from some, but not all, manufacturers of some dosages and forms of doxycycline hyclate and doxycycline monohydrate. 

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Unclogging heart arteries through wrist becoming more common

The way to a man's heart may be his wrist. More U.S. doctors are unclogging heart arteries (in men and women) by entering through the radial artery in the wrist, which is linked to less bleeding complications than the traditional route through the groin, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation.<em>"</em>

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Not Just the Baby Blues: Screening Can Help Address Postpartum Depression

If you know someone who's expecting a baby this summer, you have plenty of company. More babies are born in July, August, and September than in any other months of the year, according to 2010 Federal data.

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Small lifestyle changes may have big impact on reducing stroke risk

Making small lifestyle changes could reduce your risk of having a stroke, according to a new study in the American Heart Association journal "Stroke."

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Bad encounters may prompt obese patients to doctor-shop

Negative health care experiences could lead obese patients to switch primary care doctors repeatedly in search of a practice where they feel accepted, said Baltimore internist Kimberly A. Gudzune, MD, MPH.

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American Heart Association Teaches Americans the Two Simple Steps of Hands-OnlyTM CPR to the Beat of “Stayin’ Alive”

Do you know the two simple steps of Hands-OnlyTM CPR? Then you're ready to help save a life. In recognition of National CPR Awareness Week (June 3rd - June 8th), the American Heart Association and the WellPoint Foundation have teamed up to continue the national awareness campaign and ongoing mobile tour teaching Americans how to perform Hands-Only CPR to the beat of the Bee Gees' hit "Stayin' Alive."

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Costs to treat stroke in America may double by 2030

Costs to treat stroke are projected to more than double and the number of people having strokes may increase 20 percent by 2030, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

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Young Parents Don't Stress Over Kids' Media Use: Survey

Having grown up with gadgets galore, young parents aren't as worried about the potentially corrosive effects of too much screen time on their offspring, a new study suggests.

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Anti-smoking ads increase odds of quitting in 14 countries

Awareness of anti-smoking messages on television, radio, or billboards, or in newspapers or magazines, significantly increased the odds that current smokers intend to quit in 14 of 17 countries surveyed, according to a study released in this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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3-D Printing of Working Bionic Ears

Researchers used 3-D printing of cartilage cells and nanomaterials to create functional ears that receive radio signals. The study demonstrates that it may one day be possible to create bionic tissues and organs.

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Sleep On It - How Snoozing Strengthens Memories

When you learn something new, the best way to remember it is to sleep on it. That’s because sleeping helps strengthen memories you’ve formed throughout the day.

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Kids Poisoned by Medical Marijuana, Study Finds

Legalizing marijuana may have unintended consequences. Since medical marijuana was legalized in Colorado, more than a dozen young children have been unintentionally poisoned with the drug, researchers report.

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Diet Soda Habit as Bad for Teeth as Meth Addiction, Study Claims

Heavy consumption of diet soda can damage teeth as badly as methamphetamine or crack cocaine, a new study contends.

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NIH scientists discover molecule triggers sensation of itch

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health report they have discovered in mouse studies that a small molecule released in the spinal cord triggers a process that is later experienced in the brain as the sensation of itch.

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Study of “screen time” on mood, memory, and cognition wins top NIH Addiction Science Award

An exploration of electronic "screen time" and sleep on mood, memory and learning was given the top Addiction Science Award at the 2013 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF)-the world's largest science competition for high school students. Projects on "bath salts" and the link between fetal alcohol exposure and diabetes take other honors.

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Diagnosing heart attacks: There’s an app for that

An experimental, inexpensive iPhone application transmitted diagnostic heart images faster and more reliably than emailing photo images, according to a research study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2013.

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Losing Weight May Ease Chronic Heartburn

Obese and overweight men and women who suffer from heartburn often report relief when they lose weight, a new study shows.

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Flu in pregnancy may quadruple child’s risk for bipolar disorder

Pregnant mothers' exposure to the flu was associated with a nearly fourfold increased risk that their child would develop bipolar disorder in adulthood, in a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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One in five adults meet overall physical activity guidelines

About 20 percent of U.S. adults are meeting both the aerobic and muscle strengthening components of the federal government's physical activity recommendations, according to a report published in today's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a journal of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Living Near Heavy Traffic May Harm Kidney Function

Living near a major road may result in reduced kidney function, which could, in turn, increase people's risk for heart attack and stroke, according to a new study.

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The Benefits of Slumber - Why You Need a Good Night's Sleep

We have so many demands on our time—jobs, family, errands—not to mention finding some time to relax. To fit everything in, we often sacrifice sleep. But sleep affects both mental and physical health. It’s vital to your well-being.

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Hopeful Signs on a Long Road to a Better Health System

If you've ever thought that your experience with the health care system–good or bad–is very different from someone else's, you're not alone.

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Women’s, men’s brains respond differently to hungry infant’s cries

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have uncovered firm evidence for what many mothers have long suspected: women's brains appear to be hard-wired to respond to the cries of a hungry infant.

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Study suggests only half of Americans with hepatitis C receive complete testing for the virus

Only half of Americans identified as ever having had hepatitis C received follow-up testing showing that they were still infected, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analysis of data from a multi-area study published today in the CDC report "Vital Signs."

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Administration Offers Consumers an Unprecendented Look at Hospital Charges

Today, as part of the Obama administration's work to make our health care system more affordable and accountable, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced a three-part initiative that for the first time gives consumers information on what hospitals charge.  New data released today show significant variation across the country and within communities in what hospitals charge for common inpatient services.

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FDA issues proposal to increase consumer awareness of tanning bed risks

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a proposed order that, if finalized, would reclassify sunlamp products and require labeling to include a recommendation designed to warn young people not to use these devices.

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Increases in heart disease risk factors may decrease brain function

Brain function in adults as young as 35 may decline as their heart disease risk factors increase, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Stroke."

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Poison lips? Troubling levels of toxic metals found in cosmetics

A new analysis of the contents of lipstick and lip gloss may cause you to pause before puckering.

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NIH study uses Botox to find new wrinkle in brain communication

National Institutes of Health researchers used the popular anti-wrinkle agent Botox to discover a new and important role for a group of molecules that nerve cells use to quickly send messages. 

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Brain patterns may help predict relapse risk for alcoholism

Distinct patterns of brain activity are linked to greater rates of relapse among alcohol dependent patients in early recovery, a study has found. The research, supported by the National Institutes of Health, may give clues about which people in recovery from alcoholism are most likely to return to drinking.

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Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

Your kidneys aren’t very big—each is about the size of your fist—but they do important work. They keep you healthy by maintaining just the right balance of water and other substances inside your body.

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Blind Cords Pose Danger to Toddlers, Doctors Warn

Young children are at high risk for accidentally strangling themselves with window blind cords and parents need to be aware of this threat, doctors report.

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“Off-the-shelf” artificial blood vessels may reduce dialysis complications

Scientists bioengineered an artificial blood vessel by seeding human aorta cells onto a biodegradable mesh tube. In the process, a tubular vein develops in two months as the growing cells secrete proteins and the mesh support structure dissolves. "Off-the-shelf" blood vessels could one day reduce some complications of dialysis treatment...

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Alternative therapies may help lower blood pressure

Alternative therapies such as aerobic exercise, resistance or strength training, and isometric hand grip exercises may help reduce your blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association.

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Prescription Drug Abuse Up Among U.S. Teens: Survey

The United States appears to be in the throes of a prescription drug abuse crisis among teens, with a new survey showing that 24 percent of high school students -- more than 5 million kids -- have abused these medications.

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Soothing a Sore Throat

We’ve all had sore throats around this time of year. Your throat feels scratchy and may hurt when you swallow. What can you do to soothe a sore throat?

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NIH study sheds light on how to reset the addicted brain

Could drug addiction treatment of the future be as simple as an on/off switch in the brain? A study in rats has found that stimulating a key part of the brain reduces compulsive cocaine-seeking and suggests the possibility of changing addictive behavior generally. 

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Vitamin D may reduce risk of uterine fibroids, according to NIH study

Women who had sufficient amounts of vitamin D were 32 percent less likely to develop fibroids than women with insufficient vitamin D, according to a study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

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Drinking cup of beetroot juice daily may help lower blood pressure

A cup of beetroot juice a day may help reduce your blood pressure, according to a small study in the American Heart Association journal "Hypertension."

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New recommendations offer physicians ethical guidance for preserving trust in patient-physician relationships and the profession when using social media

American College of Physicians and Federation of State Medical Boards encourage doctors to always ‘pause before posting’ and not ‘friend’ patients in new policy paper.

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Technique Directs Immune Cells to Target Leukemia

A type of targeted immunotherapy induced remission in adults with an aggressive form of leukemia that had relapsed in 5 patients. The early results of this ongoing trial highlight the potential of the approach.

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Chelation Therapy May Help Reduce Cardiovascular Events

In a new study, chelation therapy-an unproven alternative treatment for heart disease-modestly reduced cardiovascular events in older adults who'd suffered a prior heart attack. The findings weren't conclusive but provide guidance for future research.

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Same-Sex Spouses Can Face Barriers On Health Care Under Federal Law

Mike Bosia and Steven Obranovich, of Hardwick, Vt., were married three years ago after Vermont legalized same-sex marriage. As Bosia's spouse, Obranovich is entitled to health insurance through Bosia's employer, Saint Michael's College in Colchester.

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Health Law at Three Years Highlights Coverage, Cost, and Quality Improvements

When the Affordable Care Act was signed into law 3 years ago, many Americans paid attention to popular features like letting young adults stay on their parents' health insurance until age 26 or closing the "donut hole" gap for Medicare prescription drugs.

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FDA approves Diclegis for pregnant women experiencing nausea and vomiting

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Diclegis (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) to treat pregnant women experiencing nausea and vomiting.

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How Resveratrol May Fight Aging

A new study gives insight into how resveratrol-a compound found in grapes, red wine and nuts-may ward off several age-related diseases. The findings could help in the development of drugs to curtail some of the health problems that arise as we get older.

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Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

Researchers gained new insight into how an immune cell involved in several autoimmune disorders is regulated. Among their findings was a potential link with salt consumption.

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Breath Test Might Predict Obesity Risk

A simple breath test may be able to tell if you are overweight or will be in the future, a new study suggests.

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Energy drinks may increase blood pressure, disturb heart rhythm

Energy drinks may increase blood pressure and disturb your heart’s natural rhythm, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2013 Scientific Sessions.

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Norovirus is now the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in US children

Norovirus is now the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis among children less than 5 years of age who seek medical care, according to a new study published in the "New England Journal of Medicine."

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Heart-healthy lifestyle also reduces cancer risk

Following the American Heart Association’s Life's Simple 7 steps to reduce your risk for heart disease can also help prevent cancer, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation."

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Common Genetic Factors Found in 5 Mental Disorders

Major mental disorders traditionally thought to be distinct share certain genetic glitches, according to a new study. The finding may point to better ways to diagnose and treat these conditions.

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The Genetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

An international group of researchers discovered 7 regions of the human genome associated with an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness. The findings may eventually lead to new treatment and prevention approaches to AMD.

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Green tea, coffee may help lower stroke risk

Green tea and coffee may help lower your risks of having a stroke, especially when both are a regular part of your diet. People who drank either green tea or coffee daily had about approximately 20~30 percent lower risk for one type of stroke, compared to those who seldom drank them.

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Action needed now to halt spread of deadly bacteria

A family of bacteria has become increasingly resistant to last-resort antibiotics during the past decade, and more hospitalized patients are getting lethal infections that, in some cases, are impossible to cure.

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Understanding How We Speak

A new study revealed the patterns of brain activity that produce human speech. The findings may one day lead to new approaches for treating speech disorders.

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Sweet Drinks Tied to Higher Calorie Consumption in Kids

Children who drink sugar-sweetened beverages consume more calories than other children and the beverages are the main reason for that higher calorie intake, a new study reveals.

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New Primary Care Focus Helps Patients Take Better Care of Themselves

Starting new behaviors to improve our health can be a challenge. Too often, our health care system doesn't help us learn the skills we need to stay healthy.

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Toddler 'functionally cured' of HIV infection, NIH-supported investigators report

A two-year-old child born with HIV infection and treated with antiretroviral drugs beginning in the first days of life no longer has detectable levels of virus using conventional testing despite not taking HIV medication for 10 months, according to findings presented today at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Atlanta.

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Targeting CPR education in high-risk neighborhoods could save more lives

Targeting CPR education in high-risk neighborhoods could increase the number of bystanders giving CPR and decrease deaths from cardiac arrest, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in its journal "Circulation."

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'Worried Well' Often Ignore Negative Test Results: Study

One in six people worries that they're sick even though their symptoms don't signal disease, and often these patients aren't swayed by tests that show they're fine, Scottish researchers report.

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Major Doctor Group Coalition Expands List Of Overused Tests, Treatments

The American Board of Internal Medicine, as part of its "Choosing Wisely" campaign, expanded the number of medical societies recommending caution before certain tests and procedures are ordered.

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Too Much Coffee in Pregnancy Tied to Smaller, Later Newborns, Study Says

The coffee or other caffeinated beverages a woman drinks during her pregnancy might up the odds for a low birth weight newborn or an extended pregnancy, a new study says.

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There’s room for improvement in women’s heart disease awareness

The number of women aware that heart disease is the leading cause of death has nearly doubled in the last 15 years, but that knowledge still lags in minorities and younger women, according to a new study in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation."

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Sleep and Memory in the Aging Brain

New findings reveal a connection between sleep and memory, and shed light on why forgetfulness is common in the elderly.

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High blood pressure during pregnancy may signal later heart disease risk

High blood pressure - even once or twice during routine medical care - can signal substantially higher risks of heart and kidney disease and diabetes, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation."

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Praising Kids for Efforts, Not Qualities, May Help Them Succeed

Telling your young children that they are smart may not be all that wise. A new study found that it's probably not helpful for parents to shower their young daughters or sons with commentary meant to boost self-esteem.

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Reducing sodium in U.S. may save hundreds of thousands of lives over 10 years

Less sodium in the U.S. diet could save 280,000 to 500,000 lives over 10 years, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Hypertension."

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Intensive Care Units for Newborns in Nine States See Sharp Drop in Bloodstream Infections

Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in newborns were reduced by 58 percent in less than a year in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) participating in an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality patient safety program.

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New Children's Electronic Health Record Format Announced

The benefits of electronic health records (EHRs) may become more widely available to children through an EHR format for children's health care announced today by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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New Tools Help Health Providers Reduce Patients' Risk of Falls

For older adults, falls are serious, whether they take place in the home or in a health care setting.

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Beat the Winter Blues

As the days get shorter, many people find themselves feeling sad. You might feel blue around the winter holidays, or get into a slump after the fun and festivities have ended.

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NIH urges women to protect their heart health and to encourage others to do the same

During American Heart Month in February 2013, The Heart Truth campaign of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) will celebrate the stories of women taking action to protect their hearts and who are inspiring and motivating others to make heart-healthy lifestyle changes.

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Next-generation CT scanner provides better images with minimal radiation

A new computed tomography (CT) scanner substantially reduces potentially harmful radiation while still improving overall image quality. National Institutes of Health researchers, along with engineers at Toshiba Medical Systems, worked on the scanner.

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Genes, Junk Food and Weight

Researchers gained new insight into how genetics may influence obesity by studying how the mouse equivalent of a fast-food diet affects different mouse strains. The findings may help explain why some people gain weight more easily than others.

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Brain Changes as Trust Rises With Age

Older adults are more likely than younger ones to perceive dishonest faces as trustworthy, according to a new study of social judgments and brain activity.

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Many hospitalized children who require prolonged CPR survive

Many hospitalized children can survive cardiac arrest after prolonged CPR, according to new research in "Circulation," an American Heart Association journal.

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Utah Doctor Develops Glasses To Get Rid Of Migraines

Utah Super Doctors® 2013 honoree Bradley J. Katz, MD offers new hope to migraine sufferers

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Standard Written Checklists Can Improve Patient Safety During Surgical Crises

When doctors, nurses and other hospital operating room staff follow a written safety checklist to respond when a patient experiences cardiac arrest, severe allergic reaction, bleeding followed by an irregular heart beat or other crisis during surgery, they are nearly 75 percent less likely to miss a critical clinical step, according to a new study funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Binge drinking is an under-recognized problem among women and girls

Binge drinking is a dangerous behavior that can lead to tragic circumstances.  It's not often recognized as a women's health problem but nearly 14 million U.S. women binge drink about three times a month, and consume an average of six drinks per binge, according to a Vital Signs report released today from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

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Therapy Shows Promise for Peanut Allergy

A liquid therapy placed underneath the tongues of people with peanut allergy can reduce their sensitivity to peanuts, a new study found.

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Strawberries, blueberries may cut heart attack risk in women

Eating three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries per week may help women reduce their risk of a heart attack by as much as one-third, researchers reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Millions of Americans newly eligible for quality, affordable health coverage in 2014

Because of the Affordable Care Act, millions of Americans will be newly eligible to receive quality, affordable health care through Medicaid and the new health insurance marketplaces (also known as the Exchanges) in 2014.

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FDA requiring lower recommended dose for certain sleep drugs containing zolpidem

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced it is requiring the manufacturers of Ambien, Ambien CR, Edluar and Zolpimist, widely used sleep drugs that contain the active ingredient zolpidem, to lower current recommended doses.

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NIH study uncovers details of early stages in muscle formation and regeneration

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have identified proteins that allow muscle cells in mice to form from the fusion of the early stage cells that give rise to the muscle cells. The findings have implications for understanding how to repair and rehabilitate muscle tissue and to understanding other processes involving cell fusion.

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Americans’ heart health varies significantly from state to state

"Americans reported having on average more than four of the seven risk factors for heart disease. We also found large disparities by age, sex, race/ethnicity and levels of education,"said Jing Fang, M.D., M.S., an epidemiologist with the CDC's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in Atlanta, Ga.

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Make Good on Your Resolution To Quit Smoking

For people who smoke cigarettes, the New Year is a popular time to try to quit. And it's no wonder why.

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Change your salty ways in only 21 days

Sodium – the everyday meal offender that might make your face feel puffy and your jeans look, and feel, tighter.  Did you know that by reducing your sodium intake during a three week period you can change your sodium palate and start enjoying foods with less sodium?

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Flu Activity Picks Up Nationwide

Influenza activity continues to increase in the United States and most of the country is now experiencing high levels of influenza-like-illness (ILI), according to CDC's latest FluView report.

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Genomic Technology Detects Fetal Problems

Two new studies show the potential of a genomic technique to help spot abnormalities in fetuses that conventional methods can't. One research team used the technology in prenatal testing.

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More children surviving in-hospital cardiac arrest

Hospitalized children who suffer cardiac arrest are nearly three times more likely to survive than they were about a decade ago, and no more likely to suffer brain impairment, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality & Outcomes."

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Resources to Help You Stay Healthy in the New Year

As the New Year gets closer, it's a good time to think about how to stay healthy in 2013.

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As doctors grow older, hospitals begin requiring them to prove they’re still fit

About 42 percent of the nation's 1 million physicians are older than 55 and 21 percent are older than 65, according to the American Medical Association, up from 35 percent and 18 percent, respectively, in 2006.

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TOP HOSPITALS NAMED BY LEAPFROG GROUP

The Leapfrog Group announced its annual list of Top Hospitals at its Annual Meeting. The Top Hospital designation, which is the most competitive national hospital quality award in the country, recognizes hospitals that deliver the highest quality care by preventing medical errors, reducing mortality for high-risk procedures like heart bypass surgery, and reducing hospital readmissions for patients being treated for conditions like pneumonia and heart attack. 

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Forecasting Flu Outbreaks

Scientists were able to forecast seasonal flu outbreaks using an approach common to weather prediction. The accomplishment lays the groundwork for systems to help public officials better predict and prepare for outbreaks.

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Massage Therapy

Many people associate massage with vacations or spas and consider them something of a luxury. But research is beginning to suggest this ancient form of hands-on healing may be more than an indulgence—may help improve your health.

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New Bath Salts Resource Available from NIDA

Reports of severe intoxication and dangerous health effects associated with use of bath salts have made these drugs a serious and growing public health and safety issue.

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More than half of young HIV-infected Americans are not aware of their status

Young people between the ages of 13 and 24 represent more than a quarter of new HIV infections each year (26 percent) and most of these youth living with HIV (60 percent) are unaware they are infected.

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Social media may help fight childhood obesity

Social media may be an effective tool to help children overcome obesity, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement.

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A Little Exercise Might Lengthen Life

A little physical activity can go a long way toward extending your life, regardless of your weight, a new study found. People who walked briskly or did other activity at only half the recommended amount gained nearly 2 years in life expectancy compared to inactive people.

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High blood pressure in young adults likely to go undiagnosed

Adults 18-24 years old with high blood pressure were 28 percent less likely to be diagnosed during doctor visits than those 60 and older, according to findings presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2012.

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Brain Wave Synchronization Key to Working Visual Memory

Short-term memories are stored as synchronized signals between 2 key brain hubs, according to a new study in monkeys. The findings show for the first time how the brain stores visual information for working memory tasks.

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Can’t Curb the Urge to Move? Living With Restless Legs Syndrome

Staying active is usually a good thing. But the motivation to move goes to unwelcome extremes for people with restless legs syndrome.

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60 percent of America's biggest cities are now smoke-free

Thirty of America’s 50 largest cities are now covered by laws that prohibit smoking in all indoor areas of private workplaces, restaurants, and bars, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, American Heart Association Join Forces to Reverse Childhood Obesity Epidemic

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) today announced an ambitious collaboration to reverse the nation's childhood obesity epidemic by 2015. 

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Healthy Diet May Fend Off Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

By keeping a healthy diet in the years after pregnancy, women who develop diabetes during pregnancy can greatly reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes, a new study found. About 5% of pregnant women nationwide develop high blood sugar levels even though they didn't have diabetes before pregnancy.

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Migraine-associated brain changes not related to impaired cognition

Women with migraines did not appear to experience a decline in cognitive ability over time compared to those who didn't have them, according to a nine-year follow up study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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HHS Launches BeTobaccoFree.gov

Health and Human Services (HHS) today announced the launch of BeTobaccoFree.gov, a comprehensive website providing one-stop access to the best and most up-to-date tobacco-related information from across its agencies. This consolidated resource includes general information on tobacco, federal and state laws and policies, health statistics, and evidence-based methods on how to quit.

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How much salt are you eating? Beware the sodium in these “Salty Six” foods

Eating too many salty foods can create all sorts of health problems, including high blood pressure.  But did you know a lot of common foods are packed with excess sodium? It's not just the french fries and potato chips you need to be careful with.

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Total hip replacement surgery may increase risk of stroke

Risk of ischemic stroke increases by nearly 4.7-fold and hemorrhagic stroke 4.4-fold during the first two weeks after total hip replacement surgery, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Stroke."

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Cardiac stem cells may help treat heart failure

Cardiac stem cells may one day be an effective treatment for heart failure caused by muscle scarring after a heart attack, according to late-breaking clinical trial results presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2012.

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First gene therapy study in human salivary gland shows promise

This finding comes from the first-ever safety, or Phase I, clinical study of gene therapy in a human salivary gland. Its results, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also show that the transferred gene, Aquaporin-1, has great potential to help head and neck cancer survivors who battle with chronic dry mouth. 

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Improved COPD Detection

A new technique can distinguish between different types of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and track disease progression. The method could allow for more accurate diagnoses and lead to more effective treatments for COPD.

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Regular physical activity reduces risk of dementia in older people

Regular physical activity may help older people reduce their chances of getting dementia.

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Smoke-free laws led quickly to fewer hospitalizations

Smoke-free legistlation was associated with substantially fewer hospitalizations and deaths from heart and respiratory diseases, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation<em>.</em>

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CDC Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices Recommends Tdap Immunization for Pregnant Women

The Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices voted October 24th, 14 to 0, with one abstention, to recommend that providers of prenatal care implement a Tdap immunization program for all pregnant women.

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NIH videos demonstrate behavior's role in personal health

The National Institutes of Health's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), today released four videos highlighting outstanding behavioral and social science research on mindless eating, risk-taking, diabetes management, and the evolution of skin pigmentation.

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Blood Infections in ICU Cut With Simple Measures: Study

The use of antibacterial soap and ointment on all intensive care patients led to a significant reduction in bloodstream infections, a new study shows. The findings suggest that a major change in health care practice could help save lives, according to the researchers.

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"Biggest Loser" study finds modest diet and exercise can sustain weight loss

Exercise and healthy eating reduce body fat and preserve muscle in adults better than diet alone, according to a study funded and conducted by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study was recently published online in Obesity and will be in a future print edition.

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Hospital uses ‘lean’ manufacturing techniques to speed stroke care

A hospital stroke team used auto industry "lean" manufacturing principles to accelerate treatment times, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal <em>Stroke. </em>In a prospective observational study, the average time between patients arriving at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Mo., and receiving the clot-busting agent tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), decreased 21 minutes using process improvement techniques adapted from auto manufacturing.

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NIH launches free database of drugs associated with liver injury

A free source of evidence-based information for health care professionals and for researchers studying liver injury associated with prescription and over-the-counter drugs, herbals, and dietary supplements is now available from the National Institutes of Health. Researchers and health care professionals can use the LiverTox database to identify basic and clinical research questions to be answered and to chart optimal ways to diagnose and control drug-induced liver injury.

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Language Barrier Blocks Epidural Use in Childbirth: Study

Language barriers may help explain why Hispanic women in the United States are less likely than white women to receive an epidural for pain relief during childbirth, a new study finds.

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CDC study shows 54 percent decrease in teen drinking and driving since 1991

The percentage of teens in high school (aged 16 and older) who drove when they had been drinking alcohol decreased by 54 percent between 1991 and 2011, according to a Vital Signs study released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nine out of 10 high school teens (aged 16 and older) did not drink and drive during 2011.

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After diabetes during pregnancy, healthy diet linked to reduced type 2 diabetes risk

By sticking to a healthy diet in the years after pregnancy, women who develop diabetes during pregnancy can greatly reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a study supported by the National Institutes of Health has found.

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Teamwork a Key Feature of Patient Safety Improvement Program

Doctors, nurses, and other staff have always depended on each other to provide high-quality care to patients. Now they're learning how to apply specific teamwork principles to produce better and safer care.

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Therapy Repairs Ravaged Immune System

Gene therapy can safely restore immune function in children with severe combined immunodeficiency and allow some to stop taking painful weekly injections. The finding, from a small clinical trial, offers hope for children born with this deadly condition.

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Seniors' Creativity Can Thrive Despite Dementia

"[Humans] have this enormous capacity to learn, and the arts are so intrinsic within us that even with dementia we still retain that ability for imagination and creativity," added Gay Hanna, executive director of the National Center for Creative Aging, in Washington, D.C.

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Stress, a 'Type A' Personality May Boost Stroke Risk

Stressed-out, type A personalities may be more likely to suffer a stroke than their mellow counterparts, a new Spanish study suggests.

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Sesame and rice bran oil lowers blood pressure, improves cholesterol

People who cooked with a blend of sesame and rice bran oils saw a significant drop in blood pressure and improved cholesterol levels, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure Research 2012 Scientific Sessions.

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Relation of poor sleep quality to resistant hypertension

For people who already have high blood pressure, insomnia can have serious consequences, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure Research 2012 Scientific Sessions.

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Too Much Salt is Putting Our Children's Health at Risk

The American Heart Association says a new study examining the connection between sodium intake and the blood pressure in U.S. children and teens points to the urgent need to limit salt in foods consumed by young people.

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Silent heart attacks are common and predict risk of death, MRI diagnosis shows

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more effective than electrocardiography (ECG) at identifying "silent" heart attacks, also known as unrecognized myocardial infarctions, according to a study performed by National Institutes of Health researchers and international colleagues.

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New resources help older Americans and people with disabilities maintain their independence

"Whether someone is in the hospital and ready to be discharged, or living at home but needing additional care, an options counselor can help them evaluate their needs and sift through the options available in their community to create a plan that meets their needs," says Secretary Sebelius.

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High blood pressure is out of control for too many Americans

The majority of people with high blood pressure are being treated with medicine and have seen a doctor at least twice in the past year, yet their condition is still not under control, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

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Vitamin D supplement fails to lower cholesterol in short term

Taking vitamin D supplements to compensate for vitamin D deficiency didn't improve cholesterol - at least in the short term, according to new research in "Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology," an American Heart Association journal.

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Genetic Switch Involved in Depression

The activity of a single gene sets in motion some of the brain changes seen in depression, according to a new study. The finding suggests a promising target for potential therapies.

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Brain Bleeds More Common in Smokers, Research Shows

Smoking greatly increases the risk of potentially fatal brain bleeding caused by a burst aneurysm, a new study warns.

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Lengthier resuscitation attempts improve survival rates

More patients are revived and survive cardiac arrest when treated in hospitals that generally perform resuscitation efforts for a longer amount of time, according to a new study published in Lancet.

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Breast Cancer Drug May Harm the Heart More Than Thought

Women with breast cancer who are treated with the cancer drug Herceptin may have more long-term cardiac problems than experts have thought, new research suggests.

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Children with neurologic disorders at high risk of death from flu

A disproportionately high number of children with neurologic disorders died from influenza-related complications during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, according to a study by scientists with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Stresses of poverty may impair learning ability in young children

The stresses of poverty - such as crowded conditions, financial worry, and lack of adequate child care - lead to impaired learning ability in children from impoverished backgrounds, according to a theory by a researcher funded by the National Institutes of Health. The theory is based on several years of studies matching stress hormone levels to behavioral and school readiness test results in young children from impoverished backgrounds.

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Popular Characters Can Help Kids Eat Healthy Foods Too

Superheroes and other popular kids' characters have been used to sell junk food, candy and other sugary treats to children for decades, but new research shows they also can be used to promote healthier eating habits.

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Teens Benefit by Spending More Time With Parents

Parents often assume that time spent with their kids will dwindle in adolescence. But a new study suggests that while teens try to avoid spending a lot of time with their parents and friends together, private parent-child encounters may actually increase during these critical years.

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Household Molds Linked to Childhood Asthma

Three specific species of mold were more common in the homes of babies who later developed asthma. The finding highlights the importance of preventing water damage and mold growth in households with infants.

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Gut Microbes Influence Metabolism During Pregnancy

A new study shows that pregnancy alters microbe populations in the gut. The interactions with these microbes cause metabolic changes that likely help the pregnant mother and developing baby.

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CDC Now Recommends All Baby Boomers Receive One-Time Hepatitis C Test

All U.S. baby boomers should get a one-time test for the hepatitis C virus, according to final recommendations published today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in 30 baby boomers - the generation born from 1945 through 1965 - has been infected with hepatitis C, and most don't know it.

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Blood type may influence heart disease risk

People with blood type A, B, or AB had a higher risk for coronary heart disease when compared to those with blood type O, according to new research published in "Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology," an American Heart Association journal.

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Bacteria on Skin Boost Immune Cell Function

The harmless bacteria that thrive on the skin can help immune cells fight disease-causing microbes, according to a new study in mice. The finding gives new insight into skin health.

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Baby's Healthy Diet Feeds IQ, Study Finds

Babies and toddlers fed a healthy diet may have slightly higher IQs by the time they are 8 years old than children fed less healthy foods at a young age, according to a new study.

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Violent TV Shows Keep Young Kids Awake: Study

There's more evidence that watching violent or age-inappropriate images on TV, in movies or on computers can significantly disrupt children's sleep.

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Six in 10 adults now get physically active by walking

Sixty-two percent of adults say they walked for at least once for 10 minutes or more in the previous week in 2010, compared to 56 percent in 2005, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

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West Nile virus disease cases up this year

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging people to take steps to prevent West Nile virus infections.  Outbreaks of West Nile virus disease occur each summer in the United States.  This year, some areas of the country are experiencing earlier and greater activity.

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Get Up-to-Date on Shots Before Summer Ends

For many children, August marks the end of summer vacation and the return to school. For parents, it's a good time to make sure their children are up to date on vaccines-or shots-that prevent serious diseases.

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Post-cardiac arrest care system improved survivors’ neurological status

Fewer sudden cardiac arrest survivors had neurologic impairment after a novel regional system of care was implemented, according to research published in "Circulation," an American Heart Association journal.

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Yoga may help stroke survivors improve balance

Group yoga can improve balance in stroke survivors who no longer receive rehabilitative care, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal "Stroke." In a small pilot study, researchers tested the potential benefits of yoga among chronic stroke survivors - those whose stroke occurred more than six months earlier.

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First study of heart “maps” for kids could help correct rapid rhythms

The first study of a procedure to make three-dimensional "maps" of electrical signals in children's hearts could help cardiologists correct rapid heart rhythms in young patients, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association's Basic Cardiovascular Sciences 2012 Scientific Sessions.

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Federal Report Shows Drops In Infant Mortality, Preterm Birth Rates

The infant mortality rate, the preterm birth rate, and the adolescent birth rate all continued to decline, average mathematics scores increased for 4th and 8th grade students, the violent crime victimization rate among youth fell, as did the percentage of young children living in a home where someone smoked, according to the federal government's annual statistical report on the well-being of the nation's children and youth.

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Aging heart cells rejuvenated by modified stem cells

Damaged and aged heart tissue of older heart failure patients was rejuvenated by stem cells modified by scientists, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Basic Cardiovascular Sciences 2012 Scientific Sessions. The research could one day lead to new treatments for heart failure patients, researchers said.

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Cognitive changes may be only sign of fetal alcohol exposure

Most children exposed to high levels of alcohol in the womb do not develop the distinct facial features seen in fetal alcohol syndrome, but instead show signs of abnormal intellectual or behavioral development, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and researchers in Chile.

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Exercise Can Shield the Aging Brain, Studies Show

Evidence is mounting that exercise provides some protection from memory loss and Alzheimer's disease, with three new studies showing that a variety of physical activities are associated with healthier brains in older adults. One study found that normally sedentary older adults who walked at a moderate pace three times a week for a year boosted the size of the brain region involved with memory.

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Oral immunotherapy shows promise as treatment for egg allergy

Giving children and adolescents with egg allergy small but increasing daily doses of egg white powder holds the possibility of developing into a way to enable some of them to eat egg-containing foods without having allergic reactions, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health.

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NIH study shows the deaf brain processes touch differently

People who are born deaf process the sense of touch differently than people who are born with normal hearing, according to research funding by the National Institutes of Health. The finding reveals how the early loss of a sense - in this case hearing - affects brain development. It adds to a growing list of discoveries that confirm the impact of experiences and outside influences in molding the developing brain.

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Food Choice May Affect Ability to Keep Weight Off

The mix of carbohydrate, fat and protein in your diet may be a critical factor in maintaining weight loss, a new study reports. The finding suggests that, to the body, not all calories are created equal.

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NIH-funded study finds more precise way to estimate kidney function

Measuring creatinine and cystatin C - two markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) - more precisely estimates kidney function than either marker alone, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Results appear in the July 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Despite benefit, hospitals not always alerted of incoming stroke patients

Stroke patients receive faster treatment when emergency medical services (EMS) personnel notify hospitals a possible stroke patient is en route. However, emergency personnel fail to alert hospitals of incoming stroke patients in nearly one-third of cases.

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Revealing Medical Errors Helps Chicago Hospitals Build a Safer Health System

A preventable medical error happened when Michelle Malizzo Ballog had surgery in 2008. Worse, it was followed by tragedy-her death at age 39. Officials at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago didn't dodge questions or have the family talk to the hospital's lawyers. Instead, the officials looked into their hunch that a fatal error occurred during Ms. Ballog's surgery... The hospital changed its process for giving anesthesia so the same error wouldn't happen again.

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Severe Food Allergy Reactions in Kids

Young children with allergies to milk or eggs had allergic reactions to these and other foods more often than expected, a new study reports. The researchers also found that less than a third of the children with severe allergic reactions were given epinephrine, a drug that reverses symptoms and can save lives.

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Hyperthermia: too hot for your health

Hot summer weather can pose special health risks to older adults. The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, has some advice for helping older people avoid heat-related illnesses, known as hyperthermia.

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Patient-derived stem cells could improve drug research for Parkinson's

Researchers have taken a step toward personalized medicine for Parkinson's disease, by investigating signs of the disease in patient-derived cells and testing how the cells respond to drug treatments. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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Some Crash-Avoidance Systems May Work Better Than Others

Certain new crash-avoidance systems are effective in preventing car accidents, while others may do more harm than good, researchers say.

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Heavy Coffee Intake May Affect Fertility Treatments: Study

Drinking five or more cups of coffee a day may cut in half a woman's chance of successful in vitro fertilization treatment, a new study contends.

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Asthma Rates Higher Near Busy Highway

Residents of homes that are located near congested highways have higher rates of asthma, new research finds.

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Exercise Program Boosts Health After Lung Transplant: Study

A structured exercise program boosted the overall health of lung transplant patients and reduced their risk of cardiovascular problems, a new study reports.

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As Heat Builds, Take Steps to Protect Yourself

As the first major heat wave of the summer engulfs the continental United States, health experts are urging people to take special precautions when dealing with scorching temperatures and oppressive humidity.

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Diabetes Can Make a Comeback After Weight-Loss Surgery: Study

Gastric bypass surgery reverses diabetes in many obese patients, but the disease returns in about one-fifth of them within three to five years, a new study finds.

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For young children with autism, directing attention boosts language

An intervention in which adults actively engaged the attention of preschool children with autism by pointing to toys and using other gestures to focus their attention results in a long term increase in language skills, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health.

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Study Ties Kids' Allergy Risks to Antibacterials, Preservatives

Antibacterials and preservatives in products such as soap, toothpaste and mouthwash may be linked to an increased risk of allergies in children, according to a new study.

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Questions About HDL Cholesterol

The effect of "good" cholesterol on cardiovascular disease may be more complicated than previously thought, according to a new analysis. The finding raises questions about how best to lower heart disease risk.

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Cooling Therapy for Birth Disorder Boosts Later Survival

A treatment that cools the bodies of infants who lack sufficient oxygen at birth brings benefits that last for years, a new study confirms.

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CDC study finds universal motorcycle helmet laws increase helmet use, save money

Annual cost savings in states with universal motorcycle helmet laws were nearly four times greater (per registered motorcycle) than in states without these comprehensive laws, according to a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report study released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Universal helmet laws require that motorcycle riders and passengers wear a helmet every time they ride.

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NIH-funded research shows genetics can predict success of smoking cessation and need for medications

Genetics can help determine whether a person is likely to quit smoking on his or her own or need medication to improve the chances of success, according to research published in today's American Journal of Psychiatry. Researchers say the study moves health care providers a step closer to one day providing more individualized treatment plans to help patients quit smoking.

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NIH study finds childhood CT scans linked to leukemia and brain cancer later in life

Children and young adults scanned multiple times by computed tomography (CT), a commonly used diagnostic tool, have a small increased risk of leukemia and brain tumors in the decade following their first scan. These findings are from a study of more than 175,000 children and young adults that was led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and at the Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, England.

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Knee Injections for Arthritis? Save Your Money, Study Says

It's not good news for baby boomers with arthritic knees: Injections of hyaluronic acid have little effect on pain and no effect on function, according to a new analysis. Worse, the injections may cause serious harm, Swiss researchers found.

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Clues to Alzheimer's Disease

Researchers may have discovered a mechanism behind the largest known genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The finding suggests possible strategies for prevention as well as a potential new drug target.

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U.S. High School Students Improve Motor Vehicle-related Health Behaviors

U.S. high school students have shown significant progress over the past two decades in improving many health-risk behaviors associated with the leading cause of death among youth-motor vehicle crashes-according to the 2011 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, youth are engaging in other dangerous practices such as texting and emailing while driving.

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Avoid Broken Bones: Learn About Low Bone Density

Until you or a loved one has broken a wrist or hip, it's easy to downplay the risks that come with low bone density. But these risks are serious, and the consequences can cause big life changes.Low bone density occurs when our bodies lose bone tissue faster than it can be replaced. It is a major cause of broken bones, especially at the spine, hip, and wrist. People with low bone density have either osteopenia, a mild form of this condition, or osteoporosis, a more severe type.

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Odds of quitting smoking affected by genetics

Genetics can help determine whether a person is likely to quit smoking on his or her own or need medication to improve the chances of success, according to research published in today's American Journal of Psychiatry. Researchers say the study moves health care providers a step closer to one day providing more individualized treatment plans to help patients quit smoking.

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Physical fitness may reduce hypertension risk in people with family history

If your parents have high blood pressure, you can significantly lower your risk of developing the disease with moderate exercise and increased cardiovascular fitness. People with low fitness levels and hypertensive parents have a significantly higher risk for developing the disease.

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Benefits of hypothermia for infants continue through early childhood

A treatment to reduce the body temperatures of infants who experience oxygen deficiency at birth has benefits into early childhood, according to a follow-up study by a National Institutes of Health research network.

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Technique Aims to Restore Vision

In a proof-of-principle study, researchers developed retinal implants that can potentially deliver images to surviving neurons in the eye and restore vision.

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Thought-Control Gives Paralyzed People Helping Hand

Paralyzed patients were able to reach and grasp objects by controlling a robotic arm with their thoughts, a new study reports. This advance may help restore some independence and improve quality of life for people who've lost the use of their limbs.

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Men More Likely To Be Readmitted to Hospital after Discharge

Men are more likely than women to be readmitted to the hospital within a month after being discharged, according to a new AHRQ-funded study. The risk for returning to the hospital within 30 days is higher among men who are retired, unmarried, screen positive for depression or don't visit a primary care physician for follow-up after their hospitalization, according to the study from researchers at Boston University School of Medicine.

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Heart disease and stroke deaths drop significantly for people with diabetes

Death rates for people with diabetes dropped substantially from 1997 to 2006, especially deaths related to heart disease and stroke, according to researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

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NIH study shows poor quality malaria drugs pose threat

Poor quality antimalarial drugs lead to drug resistance and inadequate treatment that pose an urgent threat to vulnerable populations, according to a National Institutes of Health study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseasesjournal. Emergence of malaria strains that are resistant to artemisinin drugs on the Thailand-Cambodia border make it imperative to improve the drug supply, stressed the authors.

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Mental Replay in Learning and Memory

A study in rats suggests that the mental replay of an experience is essential for making informed decisions. The work brings researchers closer to understanding how memories are represented in the brain and used to guide future behavior. This knowledge may eventually lead to new approaches for treating memory disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Chromosome Quirks Linked to Aging and Cancer

Large structural abnormalities in chromosomes become more common with age and may be linked to increased risk for cancer, according to 2 large-scale analyses. The findings offer insights into how cancer and other disorders might emerge as people get older.

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Alleviation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder May Improve Addiction Treatment

In a recent NIDA-funded study, women responded better to substance abuse treatment after their post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms improved, but reductions in substance abuse did not ease PTSD severity.

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Exercise slows muscle wasting from age and heart failure

A four-week exercise program for heart-failure patients slowed muscle-wasting and improved their exercise capacity, regardless of age. The study confirms that exercise can reduce inflammation in skeletal muscle. Findings offer a possible avenue for future drug therapy to treat muscle-wasting in heart failure patients.

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Bilingual Effects in the Brain

A new study found certain brain functions that are enhanced in teens who are fluent in more than one language. The finding gives new insight into how our senses help shape our brains.

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NIH encourages Americans to make healthy vision last a lifetime

Vision changes as people get older, but vision loss is not a normal part of aging. Common eye diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) threaten millions of Americans, potentially robbing them of vision, mobility, and independence.

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Two drugs better than one to treat youth with type 2 diabetes

A combination of two diabetes drugs, metformin and rosiglitazone, was more effective in treating youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes than metformin alone, a study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has found. Adding an intensive lifestyle intervention to metformin provided no more benefit than metformin therapy alone.

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One Step Forward on Quality Improvement, One Step Back on Access

You may already know that heart disease is the top cause of death for both men and women and is responsible for one in four deaths in the United States. It also costs more than $400 billion each year in health care services, drugs, and other expenses.

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Biodegradable stent safe for long-term treatment of coronary artery disease

The first fully biodegradable stent inserted into humans proved safe in a 10-year study.Major cardiac complication rates were similar to rates of non-biodegradable stents and survival rates were 98 percent.Biodegradable stents could potentially eliminate many problems associated with metal stents, such as in-stent blood clots.

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Stroke risk high when anti-clotting drugs stopped

Study Highlights:  Patients with irregular heartbeats who take anti-clotting medications are at high risk of stroke or blood clot whenever the drugs are stopped.The risks are similar whether patients are taking warfarin or a newer anti-clotting drug rivaroxaban.

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Genetics of Bone Density

A new study linked 32 novel genetic regions to bone mineral density. The findings may help researchers understand why some people are more

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'Ice Cream Headaches' Might Offer Clues to Migraines

That "brain freeze" headache you experience when eating ice cream or other cold foods may be caused by a sudden change in brain blood flow, researchers report.What's more, the new research might point to targets to treat other, more troubling forms of headache such as migraine, the U.S. team said.

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American Heart Association develops program to increase cardiac arrest survival

The American Heart Association has developed a program to help more people survive cardiac arrest. During a cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating, and unless it is restarted within minutes, the person usually dies.

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Test links strains of common parasite to severe illness in U.S. newborns

Scientists have identified which strains of the Toxoplasma gondii parasite, the cause of toxoplasmosis, are most strongly associated with premature births and severe birth defects in the United States.

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Muscle Training Effective in Treating Urinary Incontinence for Women

A type of exercise called pelvic floor muscle training is effective for treating adult women with urinary incontinence (the involuntary loss of urine) without risk of side effects, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Consumers Learning To Recognize High-Value Health Care Providers

As a savvy consumer, you shop around and compare prices before you make a big purchase. Thanks to the Internet, information about price, quality, and opinions from others takes just a few clicks of your mouse.

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Risk in Red Meat?

A new study adds to the evidence that eating red meat on a regular basis may shorten your lifespan. The findings suggest that meat eaters might help improve their health by substituting other healthy protein sources for some of the red meat they eat.

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NIH study finds women spend longer in labor now than 50 years ago

Women take longer to give birth today than did women 50 years ago, according to an analysis of nearly 140,000 deliveries conducted by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

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Diabetes Prevention A Good Investment

A new study found that programs to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes make sound economic sense.

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Nanocomplexes Label Cells for MRI Tracking

Nanocomplexes can be used to label transplanted cells so they can be tracked by MRI, according to a new study. In the future, the technique might be used to monitor whether transplanted immune or stem cells reach their targets.

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Gorilla Genome Yields Surprises

Researchers have completed a draft sequence of the gorilla genome. Their analysis reveals that people may be more closely related to gorillas than we realized.

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Halt the Hurt!

Pain-it's something we've all experienced. From our first skinned knee to the headaches, back pain and creaky joints as we age, pain is something we encounter many times.

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Dry Eyes and Mouth?

If your eyes and mouth feel as dry as a desert, there are many possible causes, such as bad air quality and certain medications.

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Early Epigenetic Effects in Alzheimer's Disease

Repression of certain gene activity in the brain appears to be an early event affecting people with Alzheimer's disease, a new study found. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, this blockade and its effects on memory were treatable.

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How Sulfa Drugs Work

Researchers have finally found out how sulfa drugs-the first class of antibiotics ever discovered-work at the molecular level. The finding offers insights into designing more robust antibiotic therapies.

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Diesel Exhaust and Lung Cancer Deaths in Miners

In a study of miners, scientists found that heavy exposure to diesel exhaust increased the risk of death from lung cancer. The risk may also extend to other workers exposed to diesel exhaust, as well as people living in urban areas with higher diesel exhaust levels.

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Egg-Producing Stem Cells Found in Women

Researchers have isolated egg-producing stem cells from the ovaries of women and observed these cells giving rise to young egg cells, or oocytes.

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Study Finds Consumers Choose High-Value Health Care Providers When Given Good Cost and Quality Information

When asked to choose a health care provider based only on cost, consumers choose the more expensive option, according to a new study funded by HHS' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) that appears in the March issue of <em>Health Affairs</em>.

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Colonoscopies Prevent Colon Cancer Deaths

Removing polyps during colonoscopy can not only prevent colorectal cancer, but also reduce deaths from the disease for years, according to a new study.

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New Processes Can Help Hospitals Spot—and Stop—Drug Errors

You might think that your doctor would know if a new drug would cause bad side effects in combination with one you already take. Or that your pharmacist could tell if a prescription you thought was for Darvon, (a painkiller), really should be for Diovan (a blood pressure drug).

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Bacteria’s Contracting Syringe Machine

Some bacteria, such as those that cause cholera, use a special system to inject toxins into the cells of host organisms and other bacteria. A new

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Using Autoinjectors to Treat Seizures

Drug delivery into muscle using an autoinjector-akin to the EpiPen used to treat serious allergic reactions-can be a fast, effective way to stop prolonged epileptic seizures.

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Drug Improves Alzheimer's-like Condition in Mice

Scientists report that a decade-old cancer drug quickly clears proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease from the brains of mice. The drug restores

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Tai Chi Increases Balance in Parkinson’s Patients

People with Parkinson's disease often have problems with balance and can suffer life-threatening falls. For patients with mild to moderate cases, a  

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Blood levels of trans–fatty acids (TFAs) in white adults in the U.S. population decreased

Blood levels of trans-fatty acids (TFAs) in white adults in the U.S. population decreased by 58 percent from 2000 to 2009 according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study

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Nine in 10 U.S. adults get too much sodium every day

Nearly all Americans consume much more sodium than they should, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Most of the sodium comes from common restaurant

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Fending Off Cardiovascular Disease

A study of data from over a quarter of a million people confirmed that traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as high blood

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Scientists Find Target for Resveratrol

Resveratrol, a compound found most famously in grapes and red wine, seems to ward off several age-related diseases. However, its mechanism

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Ancient Roots of Social Networks

Modern social networks, from small networks of friends and family to entire countries, are based on cooperation. Individuals donate to the group

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New Method Builds Bone

Researchers have developed a way to direct the body's own stem cells to the outer bone to build new, strong bone tissue. The method, developed in

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Genes Affect Sex Differences in Behavior

Men and women can seem like they're from different planets sometimes. Hormones help drive those differences. A new study shows how genes pass on the message.

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Restricted Diet Affects Surgery Risk

A new study in mice suggests that several days on a restricted diet may help the body better cope with the stress of surgery. The findings point the

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Million Hearts Campaign Aims to Lower Risk, Improve Care

With Valentine's Day around the corner, hearts shapes are everywhere - on cards, candy, and clothing. But every day of the year, your heart plays a

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Love Your Heart

February is American Heart Month-a time to reflect on the sobering fact that heart disease remains the number one killer of

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Grumbling Guts?

Most of us feel some discomfort in our guts from time to time. It may be because we're nervous about something, or perhaps we ate something that didn't agree with

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How Often Should Women Have Bone Tests?

Experts recommend that older women have regular bone density tests to screen for osteoporosis. But it's been unclear how often to repeat the

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Looking Inside Viruses

Since the discovery of the microscope, scientists have tried to visualize smaller and smaller structures to provide insights into the inner workings of

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Manganese May Prevent Toxin Damage

A new study suggests that manganese, an essential nutrient, may prevent the deadly effects of Shiga toxin. The finding may lead to cheap, effective

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Body Produces “Industrial” Lubricant for Metal Hip Implants

A lubricating layer made of graphitic carbon naturally forms in the joints of metal-on-metal hip implants, a new study shows. This solid layer, produced

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New Insights Into Old Anti-Fungal Drug

For more than 50 years, doctors have used the drug Amphotericin B (AmB) to treat systemic fungal infections. In a new study, researchers revealed a

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Researchers Find Cause of Rare Immune Disease

NIH scientists have identified a genetic mutation that causes cold temperatures to trigger allergic reactions-a condition called cold urticaria.

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Breaking Bad Habits

If you know something's bad for you, why can't you just stop? About 70% of smokers say they would like to quit. Drug and alcohol

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Mindfulness Matters

At some point in your life, someone probably told you: "Enjoy every moment. Life is short." Maybe you've smiled and rolled your eyes at this well-intentioned relative or co-worker.

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Less Invasive Surgery Just as Effective for Some Breast Cancer Patients

When breast cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes, many doctors believe that removing several more nodes provides better treatment.

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Saliva Testing Catches CMV Infection in Newborns

A saliva sample from a newborn can be used to quickly and effectively detect cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, a major cause of hearing loss in

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Baby Boomers Trigger Major Increase in Knee Replacement Surgeries

Whether it's music, lifestyles, or a refuse-to-age outlook, Baby Boomers think of themselves as trailblazers. Now, that generation born between 1946 and 1964 can claim credit for another "first"-a dramatic increase in knee

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Many Young Children Overdosing from Medicines at Home

Each year, one of every 150 two-year-olds visits an emergency department in the United States for an unintentional medication overdose, most often after finding and eating or drinking medicines

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Weighing in on Dietary Fats

With the winter holidays upon us, you'll likely be surrounded by family, friends and plenty of good food. Many of these foods,

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Most Stillbirths Caused by Placental, Pregnancy Conditions

Half of all stillbirths result from pregnancy disorders and conditions that affect the placenta, according to a new report. Risk factors already known

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Rats Show Empathy, Too

A new study shows that empathy may drive rats to help each other. The finding gives insight into the biological roots of our urge to assist others in

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Gene Therapy Helps Patients with Hemophilia

A single dose of an experimental gene therapy boosted production of a missing blood-clotting factor in people with hemophilia, a new study

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Less Medication Effective for Wheezing Preschoolers

Children with recurrent wheezing who are in danger of developing asthma fared no better taking daily low doses of inhaled corticosteroid than taking

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Antibodies Protect Against HIV in Mice

Researchers have devised a gene transfer technique in mice that, with a single injection, protects the immune cells that HIV targets. With further

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Prenatal Steroids Reduce Brain Injury in Preemies

Some of the tiniest premature babies are more likely to survive and have less brain injury if their mothers receive prenatal steroids. The finding

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Tools Help You Choose a Good Nursing Home

Finding a high-quality nursing home for a family member is a daunting task.

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Wood Cooking Stoves Combat Pneumonia

A new study found that wood-burning cooking stoves with chimneys lowered exposure to wood smoke from open cooking fires and reduced the rate of severe pneumonia by 30% in children less than 18 months of age.

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Key Hearing Proteins Identified

Researchers have found what appear to be 2 key components of the long-sought-after mechanotransduction channel in the inner ear-the place

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Targeted Light Therapy Destroys Cancer Cells

Scientists have developed a noninvasive technique that uses light to selectively wipe out cancerous cells in mice without harming surrounding tissue.

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Elderly at risk of hospitalizations from key medications

Each year, there are nearly 100,000 emergency hospitalizations for adverse drug events in U.S. adults aged 65 years or older, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study published today

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New Study Finds E-prescribing Is Safe and Efficient, but Barriers Remain

Physician practices and pharmacies generally view electronic prescribing as an important tool to improve patient safety and save time, but both groups face barriers to realizing the technology's full benefit, according to a study funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Organ Transplants and Cancer Risk

Organ transplant recipients have a high risk of developing 32 different types of cancer, according to a new study. Future research to understand why may

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Stroke Risk Factors Linked to Cognitive Problems

A new study found that high blood pressure and other known risk factors for stroke may also raise the risk of developing cognitive problems. The finding

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Worried Sick

Anxiety is an uneasy feeling that something may harm you or a loved one. This feeling can be normal and sometimes even helpful. If you're starting a new job

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Why Nicotine is a Gateway Drug

A new study in mice shows how tobacco products could act as gateway drugs, opening the door to use of illicit drugs. Nicotine, the researchers

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CDC Now Tracking Antibiotic Use in Hospitals

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is launching a new antibiotic tracking system allowing hospitals to monitor

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New AHRQ Campaign Encourages Hispanics to Work with Their Doctors to Make the Best Treatment Decisions

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is partnering with Hispanic-serving organizations to promote the Agency's Spanish-language resources and to encourage consumers to become more active partners in their health care.

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Genes and the Brain

Two related studies revealed gene activity in the brains of people of different genders and ethnicities, from fetal development to old age.

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Switching Neighborhoods May Improve Health

Women encouraged to move with their families from a poor neighborhood to a more affluent one had lower rates of extreme obesity and diabetes 10 to 15 years later, a new study found.

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Annual Chest X-rays Don’t Cut Lung Cancer Deaths

A large multi-center study reports that annual chest X-ray screening offers no benefits over standard medical care in reducing deaths from lung cancer.

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Yoga or Stretching Eases Low Back Pain

A new study reports that weekly classes of yoga or intensive stretching are equally effective at reducing low back pain and improving back movement.

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Perinatal Antidepressant May Affect Brain Development

Rats exposed to an antidepressant just before and after birth had altered behaviors and substantial brain abnormalities. The findings raise questions

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How to Get a Good Value When Choosing a Health Plan

Welcome to November-with its shorter days, cooler weather, and, for many, decisions about choosing a health insurance plan for the coming year. Whether you're covered by an employer's plan, by Medicare, or you are self-employed or unemployed, doing homework

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Report Finds Parent Training Effective for Treating Young Children With ADHD

Formal training in parenting strategies is a low-risk, effective method for improving behavior in preschool-age children at risk for developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), while there is less evidence supporting the use of medications for children younger than 6 years old, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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CDC recommends ways to reduce the threat of strokes

In the time needed to read out loud the headline on this story, someone has died from a stroke. Every 6 seconds, someone in the world dies from stroke. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in

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CDC Launches Effort to Protect Cancer Patients from Infections

Each year more than one million patients receive cancer treatment in an outpatient oncology clinic. Despite advances in oncology care, infections from both community and health care settings remain a

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Protein Creates Partition Between Bacteria and the Gut

Scientists have identified a microbe-fighting protein that helps create a buffer zone between the inner walls of the intestines and the bacteria within.

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Study Points to Potential Treatment for Sickle Cell Disease

Scientists corrected sickle cell disease in adult laboratory mice by activating production of a special blood protein normally produced only before birth.

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Prostate Cancer Risk from Vitamin E Supplements

A new study found that vitamin E, once thought to reduce the risk of prostate cancer, may actually increase the risk.

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Birth Defects May Be Linked to High Blood Pressure, Not Use of ACE Inhibitors in Early Pregnancy

Women who take angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat high blood pressure in the first trimester of their pregnancies are at no greater risk of having babies with birth defects than are women who take other types of high blood pressure medication or who take no blood pressure drugs, according to a new

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DNA Primer Boosts Antibodies Against Avian Flu

Production of avian flu-fighting antibodies rose significantly when healthy adults were given a DNA "primer" vaccine 6 months before receiving an avian

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Doctors Miss Alcohol Screening Opportunities

Physicians often fail to counsel their young adult patients about excessive alcohol use, a new study found.

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New Initiative Urges Better Communication between Clinicians and Patients

Even with heart disease and diabetes, Bill Lee didn't see the point in asking questions about his medical care. After all, his doctors had the expertise, not him. And if the medicines they prescribed for his conditions didn't make him feel better, what could he do?

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Gene Variant Affects Response to Asthma Drugs

A genetic variant may explain why some people with asthma don't respond well to inhaled corticosteroids, the most widely prescribed medicine for

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No Effect of Saw Palmetto on Urinary Symptoms

In a new study, a widely used herbal dietary supplement called saw palmetto was no better than placebo in reducing urinary problems caused by prostate enlargement.

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Insulin Nasal Spray Shows Promise for Alzheimer’s Disease

A small clinical trial has found that daily doses of an insulin nasal spray can slow memory loss and preserve thinking skills in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

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Weighty Issues for Kids

Kids face a lot of challenges as they grow up: Learning how to make and keep friends, get homework done and have fun while staying

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"Off-label" Use of Antipsychotic Drugs for Some Conditions Not Supported by Evidence

There is little evidence to support the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs for some treatments other than their officially approved purposes, even though many clinicians continue to commonly prescribe these drugs for so-called "off label"

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Genes that Influence Blood Pressure

In one of the largest genomic studies ever, an international research consortium identified 29 genetic variations that influence blood pressure.

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Gene Linked to Optimism and Self-Esteem

Why can some people make it through difficult times with little trouble while others crumble under the same circumstances? A new study suggests

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Report Finds DMARDs Effective in Treating Juvenile Arthritis

Medications known as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, or DMARDs, appear to be more effective than other treatments for children with arthritis, but there is not enough evidence to support one kind of DMARD over another, according to a new report from HHS' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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New Guides Compare Benefits and Risks of GERD Treatments

New plain-language publications from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) compare the benefits and risks of treatments for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a digestive condition that affects millions of Americans and can be treated with medications or surgery.

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Insights Into Tumor-Associated Epilepsy

Glioma, one of the most deadly and common types of brain tumor, is often associated with seizures, but the origins of these seizures and effective

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Five Lifestyle Factors Lower Diabetes Risk

A new analysis has found that a combination of 5 healthy lifestyle factors may help reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes, even if family

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Predicting How Diet and Exercise Affect Weight

Researchers have created a mathematical model-along with an accompanying online weight simulation tool-of what happens when people

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Risky Business

Adolescence can be a bewildering time-for both teens and their parents. Yet it can also be thrilling to watch kids grow and

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When a Bundle of Joy Brings Sorrow

A baby's birth is usually a time of joy and celebration. For parents, though, the delight might be tempered with worries about the baby's safety, family finances and

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Smoking and Bladder Cancer

Current cigarette smokers have a higher risk of bladder cancer than previously reported, according to new research. The study also found that

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Research on Women's Health Issues Informs Treatment Choices

As individuals, we want choices that reflect who we are and what's right for our situation. Getting the right health care is no different.

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Ringing in Your Ears?

Tinnitus is commonly described as a ringing in the ears, but some people also hear it as a roaring, clicking, hissing or buzzing. It may be soft or loud, and it might

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Gene Defect Linked to Disfiguring Disorder

Scientists have identified the faulty gene responsible for Proteus syndrome, a rare disorder marked by uncontrolled growth of certain body

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Nighttime-breathing Treatments Backed by Strongest Evidence among Options To Treat Sleep Apnea

Among the treatments for obstructive sleep apnea, the effectiveness of a nighttime-breathing machine called a "CPAP" was backed by the strongest evidence, and a mouthpiece worn at night was also shown to be effective, according to a new report funded by HHS' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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New Spanish-Language Guides Inform Decisions about Heart Disease and Other Illnesses

A free, illustrated easy-to-read pamphlet that compares drugs for preventing heart attacks, heart failure or strokes in people with stable coronary heart disease is one of six new Spanish-language publications from HHS' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality that help patients compare treatments for common illnesses.

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Claims About Cocoa

Many of us would love to believe that chocolate is a health food. Maybe you've heard or read about its potential benefits. Eating chocolate may have

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Serotonin Helps Control Body Temperature and Breathing

Serotonin-producing cells in the mouse brain play an essential role in maintaining a healthy balance in body temperature and breathing. The

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Placebo Improves Asthma Symptoms, But Not Lung Function

Placebo treatment may make asthma patients feel better but not actually lessen disease, according to a new study. The finding helps clarify the

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Why You Need to Explore Your Treatment Options

Hearing that you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or some other serious condition can be a life-changing moment. Finding the best treatment option to manage it takes a bit longer, but it can make a

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Updates to Family History May Improve Cancer Screening

Family histories of cancer can change significantly between ages 30 and 50 and may warrant earlier or more intense cancer screening. The new

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Mechanism of Fast-Acting Antidepressant Revealed

A new study in mice has identified the molecular players involved in the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine, a common anesthetic. The

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Using Light and Sound to Detect Artery Blockage

Scientists have developed a 3-D imaging method that uses both light and sound waves to spot fatty deposits within tissues. The technique holds

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Certain Foods Linked to Long-term Weight Gain

Munching more unprocessed plant foods may help keep the middle-aged bulge away, a new study suggests. On the other hand, meat, french fries

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Insights into Math Learning Difficulties

The innate ability to estimate quantities is impaired in children who have a math learning disability, according to a new report. The study also found that

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A Breakdown in Breathing

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited illness that ravages the lungs and many other organs in the body. Fifty years ago, children with CF

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What is Pink Eye, and How is it Treated?

Conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye, involves inflammation of the outer layer of the eye and inside of the eyelid. It is most commonly caused by viruses,

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Resources to Help You Be a Better Caregiver

Many of us are-or will become-a caregiver to a parent, spouse, child, or other loved one. When that happens, you will need to find out a lot about a disease or condition, ask good questions about treatment options, and make the

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Summer Travel

Maybe you're counting down the days until your summer vacation. Or just got word your next business meeting will be in Boise or Bangkok.

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Brain Pathway Links Nicotine and Weight Loss

Smokers often gain weight when they quit. A new study in mice may help explain why. Scientists have pinpointed a brain receptor that seems to

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New videos, website offer important resources for people affected by diabetes

New videos to help people make lifestyle changes and cope with the demands of diabetes were announced by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP). The series of three- to five-minute

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National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Sleep Apnea

Experiencing daytime sleepiness, depression, forgetfulness, anxiety?  You may have sleep apnea.

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Autism Blurs Distinctions Between Brain Regions

A new analysis of gene expression in the brain suggests that autism blurs the molecular differences that normally distinguish different brain regions. This and other insights provide a new framework for understanding what causes autism and related disorders.

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New Public Service Campaign Urges Hispanics To Talk With Their Doctor

Hispanics are less likely to see a doctor or other health professionals regularly than other ethnics groups. The data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is startling. Half (47 percent) of adult Hispanics reported that they did not see a doctor in 2008, compared with 29 percent of adults in other ethnic groups.

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Safety Culture Creates Better Care for Patients

The more we know about safety, the better.That's why a landmark report on medical errors from the Institute of Medicine remains as important today as it did when it came out 10 years ago. Called "To Err is Human,"  the report urged hospitals to develop a "culture of safety" to reduce risks and improve care for patients.

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Health IT Tools Help with Care and Costs

More hospitals and doctors' offices are using health information technology (health IT). And that's good news for patients.

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What You Can Do To Prevent A Fall

When kids fall down, they can usually get up and return to play quickly. But for older adults, falls can be serious.

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Focus on Heart Health

February is a time when love is in the air. It is also American Heart Month. While you're thinking of hearts this Valentine's Day, do yourself—and your loved ones—a favor: focus on your own heart.

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Your Options for Treating Rotator Cuff Tears

It's a fact of life: as we get older, we're more likely to get hurt when we exercise or take on certain everyday tasks. Routine activities like playing tennis or placing items on shelves can result in a common problem—the rotator cuff injury.

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Don't Let Medicines Cause Harm

We take more medicines than ever to maintain or improve our health. But over the last decade, many baby boomers and seniors have ended up in the hospital because the medications they expected to help them actually hurt them.

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Quitting Smoking: You Can Do It

If you've ever smoked cigarettes and tried to quit, you know it's not easy to kick the habit.

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Focus on Obesity

Today, 72 million Americans are obese. As you probably know, obese people are more likely to suffer from diabetes, heart disease and other chronic health problems. But did you also know obesity can be bad for your budget?

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Improving Your Health Literacy

There is a truism in health care: When you don't fully understand or can't act on information about your health care, you are more likely to be in poorer health. Nearly all of us, about 9 of every 10 American adults, have some problems with health literary.

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Treating High Cholesterol

If you're older than 45, there's a good chance that you or someone you know has high cholesterol. It's so common that treating high cholesterol led to 44 million doctor visits in 2006.

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Why It's Wise to Use a Health Advocate

Imagine that your doctor just gave you a serious diagnosis or told you she was concerned about the results of your medical test. You might understandably become scared.

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How to Avoid the Round-Trip Visit to the Hospital

When patients get out of the hospital, it's usually a sign that their health is getting better and they're ready to recover at home. Unfortunately, millions of patients each year end up back in the hospital. In fact, 1 in 5 Medicare patients go back within 1 month of being released. Even more people face unexpected medical problems within weeks of leaving the hospital.

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Healthcare-Associated Infections: They Can Happen to You

You shouldn't have to worry about getting sick because of an infection you may pick up when you're getting treated in a hospital or other health care setting. Unfortunately, you have reason to be concerned.

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Same-Day Surgery: What You Should Know

If you need surgery, there's a better-than-average chance that you'll have it and go home the same day. That's good news for several reasons, but same-day surgery does require some planning on your part.

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Comparing Blood Pressure Medicines

Today, it may seem easier to get information about a new oven or drill before you buy one than finding clear information about the medicine or treatment that's best for you. That shouldn't be the case, especially for common health conditions like high blood pressure.

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Comparing Diabetes Drugs

We all like having choices. But sometimes, choices can be overwhelming. Marketing research shows that when faced with many choices, people can become frustrated or indecisive.

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Comparing Medical Treatments for Antidepressants

About one in every six adults experiences depression at some point in his or her life. The good news is that depression can be treated to give you a better quality of life. But finding the right treatment that fits your needs can sometimes be tricky.

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Depression linked to greater risk of peripheral artery disease

Depression may be associated with an increased risk of arterial narrowing in the legs and pelvis, a condition known as peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 2012 Scientific Sessions in Chicago.

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Study finds commercial baby foods do not meet infants' dietary needs

Commercial baby foods don't meet infants' dietary needs when they are weaning, according to a new study. That's because commercial foods are predominately sweet foods that provide little extra nutritional benefit over breast or formula milk, the researchers said. They also said commercial baby foods are marketed for use in infants beginning at the age of 4 months, an age when they should still be breast-fed only.

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Splints Placed Improperly In 93% of Suspected Pediatric Fractures Treated In Emergency Rooms/Urgent Care Centers

University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers found improper splinting often caused swelling and skin problems.

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Obesity Soon to Overtake Smoking As #1 Cause of Preventable Cancer

By 2030, almost a half million Americans may be diagnosed with obesity-related cancers annually.

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Processed Meat Consumption is Not Good for Sperm’s Fertilizing Ability

A recent study suggests the type of meat a man consumes may influence his sperm's ability to fertilize an egg.

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